Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

Participation, Representation, and Trust in Racialized or Marginalized Communities as Weapons Against Systemic Racism

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Systemic racism refers to racism that is embedded in the processes, laws, and regulations of an institution. It extends beyond individual attitudes or acts of racism to encompass broader patterns of harmful or exclusionary policies and treatment of individuals. As a settler colonial state, systemic racism is deeply rooted in every institution of Canada, and continues to be upheld and reinforced to the detriment of racialized and marginalized communities. “Systemic Racism Within the Justice System,” hosted by Correctional Service Canada, called upon a panel of practitioners and advocates who accept and admit that systemic racism permeates Canada’s criminal justice system to discuss the some of the challenges involved in addressing systemic racism and propose solutions to it. Warden Gary Sears and Assistant Warden Management Services Barbara Sagh from the Edmonton Institution,...

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Extending Social Science Research Partnerships to Canada’s North: A Mitacs Panel

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta

Mitacs, an independent, not-for-profit organization that fosters global growth and innovation, hosted a two-part session entitled, “Developing Research Partnerships in Canada’s North – Opportunities and Challenges: How Social Sciences Can Contribute,” at Congress. The first part was available as an on-demand pre-recorded 32-minute video to watch before the live Q&A session on Thursday, June 3, 2021 that comprised the second part. The pre-recorded video examined research partnerships between Mitacs, academia, and for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. At the live Q&A session, the three panelists who were featured in the pre-recorded video spoke on their process for developing relationships during their research partnerships; their experiences working in co-construction; how they ensured that their research was driven by the needs of the community;...

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Reflecting on Historical Indigenous-Canada Relations; Building New, Healthy Relationships for the Future

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta

Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future,” was an open event hosted by the University of Manitoba Press and moderated by their Sales and Marketing Supervisor, David Larsen. It celebrated the upcoming launch on June 8, 2021 of co-editors Katherine Graham and David Newhouse’s book by the same name, Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future, which examines the influence of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP), a report published in 1996, on Indigenous-Canada relations. With the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples laying the foundational work for subsequent milestones in Indigenous-Canada relations, Graham and Newhouse considered avenues by which we may “establish a new relationship, build healthy and powerful communities, engage citizens, and move to action.”

Professor Emeritus at Trent University Marlene Brant Castellano opened by providing...

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Addressing Burnout: Is Doing Equity Work Worth the Costs?

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta

In an era of increasing hostility towards the incorporation of diversity, inclusion, equity, and anti-colonial policies and practices in institutional settings, “We Are Dropping Like Flies: The Professional and Physiological Implications of Doing Equity Work” an open event hosted by the Canadian Sociological Association and moderated by Associate Professor at Mount Royal University Irene Shankar, invited four social justice scholars to provide insight on the personal and professional costs of performing equity work.

PhD Candidate in Sociology at The University of British Columbia Jennifer Adkins, Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging at ATB Financial Roselle M. Gonsalves, Assistant Professor in Indigenous Studies at Mount Royal University Vicki Bouvier, and Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Language Revitalization and Decolonizing Education at...

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The Discrimination against Black Co-ops

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus.

The Canadian Association for Studies in Co-operation “Racial Justice and Cooperatives” open event webcast featured a powerful presentation, organised around visual stories, by Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Professor of Community Justice and Social Economic Development, John Jay College.

Her presentation addressed ways cooperatives have been used to achieve economic democracy, racial justice and the challenges to achieving racial inclusion and racial justice in the cooperative movement in North America.

Nembhard began by detailing how North America has a history of colonialism including asset stripping, settler attitudes and the economic sabotage of Black co-ops. The White supremacists used financial sabotage to gain an excessive and unfair competition. This included and was not limited to:

  • railroads...

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Addressing White Supremacy: Anti-Racist Technologies

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus.

The Canadian Communication Association’s “How to Make Your Technology Anti-Racist” open event webcast featured Charlton Mcllwain, Professor, Media, Culture, and Communications at NYU Alliance for Public Interest Technology.

Mcllwain recently published a book titled, “Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the Afronet to Black Lives Matter'', which focuses on the intersections of computing technology, race, inequality, and racial justice activism.

Mcllwain described his book as a historically written text narrating and connecting multiple decades of relationships between African Americans and computing technologies from a time when racial justice and computer revolutions were occurring simultaneously.

“Anti-racist technologies not only diminish the scourge of racism and white...

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Getting Your Research Message Across: A Workshop

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

As part of the Career Corner series, Charity Slobod, Community Connect Lead and Professional Development Coordinator of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, and Jay Friesen, Faculty of Arts Community Service-Learning Partnership Coordinator, presented an Arts Impact Workshop entitled “So What? Who Cares?” This workshop aimed to explain how answering both the question of “So What?” and the question of “Who Cares?” is crucial to obtaining grants and scholarships for conducting your research, engaging the community with your research, or simply making it known to the world that your research matters and why it does. While normally conducted as an intensive three-hour workshop involving research pitch improvisation, this workshop was condensed into a short one-hour workshop that included audience engagement in the form of participants pitching...

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Indigenous-led Conservation: A Pathway to Reconcile with our Indigenous Community

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

In the first of Congress 2021’s Big Thinking series, titled “Yáázǫ Kéorat’ı̨ (We see the daylight),” member of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative The Honorable Ethel Blondin-Andrew shed light on how clean water, good jobs, and active participation in diverse local economies through Indigenous-led conservation are effective pathways to healthy futures for both the land and its inhabitants. 

Blondin-Andrew, the first Indigenous woman elected to Parliament and recipient of the 2019 Maclean’s “Lifetime Achievement Award”, started her presentation by offering a rare glimpse into her life as a child.   

She described her grandmother, a healer and one of her parental figures in her childhood, as a fearless and strong matriarch who transcended gender lines and taught her the gifts of giving, receiving and serving. This...

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Listen to the Experts: How to Publish and Market your Scholarly Book

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her) - PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

At Congress 2021, there are multiple resources to supplement your scholarly work. One of them was the “Publishing and Marketing your Scholarly Book” panel hosted by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Canadian editors and marketing specialists from the country’s top scholarly presses, Pamela Holway, Stephen Shapiro and Erin Rolfs, guided their audience through the publication process beginning at how to write an effective book proposal and ending with demystifying the marketing process after your book is published.  

Stephen Shapiro, Acquisitions Editor for the University of Toronto Press, led the first presentation on how to effectively begin the process of publishing a scholarly manuscript. Shapiro insists that...

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