ASPP and Canada Prizes

ASPP and Canada Prizes

Awards to Scholarly Publications Program

The Federation is the administrator of the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP), a competitive funding program designed to assist with the publication of scholarly books. Under the program’s mandate to support books of advanced scholarship in the humanities and social sciences that make an important contribution to knowledge, the ASPP contributes 1.5 million dollars to the dissemination of Canadian research annually and has supported the publication of over 7,000 books.

The Federation supports Open Access and has established a policy to actively promote and facilitate Open Access publishing of ASPP-funded books. The policy, adopted as of April 1, 2015, is based on the following principles:

  • The Federation supports Open Access; and
  • A dynamic Canadian scholarly publishing sector continues to be of utmost importance to the dissemination of Canadian research.

The policy states that the Federation will actively promote and facilitate Open Access publishing of ASPP-funded books.


Canada Prizes

The Canada Prizes are awarded annually to the best scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences that have received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP). The winning books make an exceptional contribution to scholarship, are engagingly written, and enrich the social, cultural and intellectual life of Canada.

Winners
Finalists
Jury members
Call for Nominations


Winners

Canada Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Wendy Wickwire, At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging (UBC Press)

Prix du Canada en sciences humaines et sociales

Michel Bouchard, Guillaume Marcotte, and Sébastien Malette. Les Bois-Brûlés de l’Outaouais: une étude ethnoculturelle des Métis de la Gatineau. (Presses de l’Université Laval)


Finalists

This year’s finalists are:

Canada Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Prix du Canada en sciences humaines et sociales

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Jury

The Federation entrusts the selection of the Canada Prizes to a jury selected from past Canada Prizes winners, including prominent scholars and university leaders.
 

The jurors for the 2020 Canada Prize (English prize) are:

  • Eric Helleiner
    Professor of Political Science
    University of Waterloo
  • Arthur Ray
    Professor Emeritus
    Department of History
    The University of British Columbia
  • Barrington Walker
    Senior Advisor Equity Diversity and Inclusion
    Professor of History
    Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Noreen Golfman
    Office of the Provost and Vice President (Academic)
    Memorial University

The jurors for the Prix du Canada 2020 (French prize) are:

  • Marion Froger (Chair)
    Professeure agrégée, Département d'histoire de l'art et d'études cinématographiques, Université de Montréal
    Directrice, revue Intermédialités
  • Nathalie Des Rosiers
    UOttawa Faculty of Law
    Principal of Massey College, University of Toronto
  • Yan Hamel
    Professeur, Département de sciences humaines, arts et communication
    Université Téluq
  • Thomas De Koninck
    Membre de l’Ordre du Canada, et de la Société Royale du Canada
    Membre correspondant de l’Institut (Académie des Sciences morales et politiques), et Officier de l’Ordre des Palmes académiques de France
    Professeur émérite, Faculté de philosophie, Université Laval
    Titulaire de la Chaire « La philosophie dans le monde actuel »

Canada Prizes Q&A

What are the Canada Prizes?

The Canada Prizes are awarded annually to books in the humanities and social sciences that have received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP.) Finalists and winners are chosen by an independent jury of scholars. The winning books make an exceptional contribution to scholarship, are engagingly written, and enrich the social, cultural and intellectual life of Canada.

What books are eligible?

All eligible books have received funding from the Federation’s Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP), which provides financial support for the publication and translation of books of advanced scholarship in the humanities and social sciences that make an important contribution to knowledge.

How many prizes are awarded?

Every year, two prizes are awarded:

  • Canada Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences (English)
  • Prix du Canada en sciences humaines et sociales (French)

How are winners selected?

Eligible books are first nominated by their publishers. Then two independent juries, one Anglophone and one Francophone, each assess about 45 nominated books before selecting finalists and winners.

Who are the jurors?

Juries are composed of four members, typically including past winners and finalists and other respected scholars and academic leaders. Jurors are selected from disciplines across the humanities and social sciences. The Federation strives to achieve gender equity and balance among regions and institutions; and to support diversity and, whenever possible, ensure participation by Black, Indigenous, and other racialized scholars.

Where can I find a list of past Canada Prizes winners?

A complete list of past winners is available here: www.ideas-idees.ca/events/canada-prizes/archives

Prix du Canada 2020

Winner: Michel Bouchard, Sébastien Malette et Guillaume Marcotte, Les Bois-Brûlés de l'Outaouais - Une étude ethnoculturelle des Métis de la Gatineau (Presses de l’Université Laval)

Who selected the Prix du Canada 2020?

The Prix du Canada 2020 was selected by an independent jury of prominent Francophone scholars.

Why did the jury choose this book?

While noting the book’s controversial subject matter, the jury called it “a thorough investigation” and said its findings were “extremely enlightening.”

According to the Jury:

The study of the Métis of western Quebec by authors Bouchard, Malette and Marcotte is an extremely thorough investigation into a little-known “Métis identity phenomenon.” It relates the untold story of the Bois-Brûlés of the Gatineau Valley who have ties of kinship with the Red River and Great Lakes Métis (whose history is known), sharing the same lifestyle and culture, a similar sense of belonging and a common awareness of identity. The authors acknowledge that the subject is controversial, but the findings of their ethnohistorical investigation are extremely enlightening with respect to several distinctive aspects of this community: a syncretic culture that combines elements borrowed from Indigenous and European cultures; an intergenerationally fluid identity; and transmission of a cultural identity that is unconnected to a notion of ethnic “purity,” based on a specific social structure (associated with the fur trade) and land occupancy (hunting practices), kinship ties, political demands, and noted clusters (around missions or in response to stated borders).

The authors' analysis of the documentary sources was painstaking. Their conceptual framework is carefully defined, and each stage is based on a transparent methodology. The challenge was a sizable one: reconstructing the full presence of a historical community in the Maniwaki area whose invisible existence could only be traced by cross-referencing some often stigmatizing statements, reports from a variety of sources, correspondence, frequently exclusionary policies, spoken memories and genealogical research. An exemplary and meticulous work.

Another reviewer said: “There have been sharp debates about Métis identity in many parts of Canada. Bois-Brûlés enters this field through its strong scholarly commitment to archival and ethnographic evidence. It adds further nuance and subtlety to these debates and sheds significant light on a contested field.”(John Borrows, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law, University of Victoria Law School

Source: www.ubcpress.ca/bois-brules )

Following the jury’s decision, we have spoken with scholars who have deep concerns and criticisms with this book, including Métis scholars. We have gained a much greater appreciation of the concerns about Indigenous self-identification, and we commit to learning more about them and to making sure that the views of Indigenous peoples are effectively represented in all our activities going forward, including the Canada Prizes. We welcome opportunities to better understand and discuss those perspectives.

Does the Federation endorse the claims made by the authors of the book?

No, it does not. The prizewinner was selected by an independent jury of francophone scholars, and the views expressed by the authors are their own.


 

Call for Nominations

The call for nominations for the 2021 prizes will open in late summer 2020.

Nominated titles will be forwarded to the jury, who will select the finalists and the winner.

Questions? Email aspp-paes@ideas-idees.ca.

 


About the Canada Prizes

Archives: Canada Prizes