Equity Matters

Guess who’s coming to dinner? That is, after you hire us.

Guest post by Dr. Annette Henry, Professor and David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education and the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia

Consider the following statements from search committee meetings at various universities involving racialized candidates. My purpose in sharing these statements is to raise questions about institutional commitments to hire Black faculty.

Our first candidate understands this theory the way we do, but the second candidate has another interpretation of the theory”

This example illustrates how faculty may unwittingly reproduce their own thinking by hiring people who think like them, and in which faculty members may find flimsy reasons to not hire qualified candidates under...

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Guess who’s coming to dinner? That is, after you hire us.

Guest post by Dr. Annette Henry, Professor and David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education and the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia

Consider the following statements from search committee meetings at various universities involving racialized candidates. My purpose in sharing these statements is to raise questions about institutional commitments to hire Black faculty.

Our first candidate understands this theory the way we do, but the second candidate has another interpretation of the theory”

This example illustrates how faculty may unwittingly reproduce their own thinking by hiring people who think like them, and in which faculty members may find flimsy reasons to not hire qualified candidates under...

Read more »

Rethinking capacity: on preserving the dignity of risk

Guest post by Elizabeth C. Mohler, Ph.D Student in Occupational Science at Western University.

I recently came across an article in the Walrus titled: "When Is a Senior No Longer Capable of Making Their Own Decisions?" The article outlined what is involved in a capacity assessment, who is authorized to provide said assessments, illustrated narratives of individuals who were assessed, and the consequences associated with the assessment’s results. Capacity Assessment is the formal assessment of a person's mental capacity to make decisions about property and personal care. Under the Substitute Decisions Act, many situations require capacity assessments to be conducted by specially qualified assessors who must follow specific guidelines. 

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Rethinking capacity: on preserving the dignity of risk

Guest post by Elizabeth C. Mohler, Ph.D Student in Occupational Science at Western University.

I recently came across an article in the Walrus titled: "When Is a Senior No Longer Capable of Making Their Own Decisions?" The article outlined what is involved in a capacity assessment, who is authorized to provide said assessments, illustrated narratives of individuals who were assessed, and the consequences associated with the assessment’s results. Capacity Assessment is the formal assessment of a person's mental capacity to make decisions about property and personal care. Under the Substitute Decisions Act, many situations require capacity assessments to be conducted by specially qualified assessors who must follow specific guidelines. 

...

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Saying "yes" to women experts: Informed Opinions advances women's expertise during a time of increased inequality

Lily Polowin, Digital Communications Officer at the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

You may have read the headlines: women with children have been getting pushed out of the workforce due to childcare demands during the pandemic; women have been submitting fewer articles for publication in academic journals since the start of the pandemic; and even when promoted to the second highest position in government, women’s qualifications still come under suspicion. It’s a well-established fact that global crises don’t affect everyone...

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Saying "yes" to women experts: Informed Opinions advances women's expertise during a time of increased inequality

Lily Polowin, Digital Communications Officer at the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

You may have read the headlines: women with children have been getting pushed out of the workforce due to childcare demands during the pandemic; women have been submitting fewer articles for publication in academic journals since the start of the pandemic; and even when promoted to the second highest position in government, women’s qualifications still come under suspicion. It’s a well-established fact that global crises don’t affect everyone...

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Le confinement comme prétexte politique

Blogue invité par Patrick Ouadiaboutou, Enseignant chercheur et auteur, Université Marien Ngouabi,Congo Brazzaville. 

L’année 2019 s’est refermée sur une crise sanitaire d’ampleur mondiale qui augure des lendemains sombres du premier semestre 2020. En effet, commencée dans la Wuhan comme épidémie le 17 Novembre 2019, le coronavirus deviendra très vite une pandémie compte tenu de son expansion rapide sur tous les continents. Entre autres mesures prises pour endiguer ce fléau  jusqu’ici sans remède, figure le confinement des habitants en vue de stopper la chaîne de contamination. L’Afrique, un des cinq continents, n’en est pas épargné. Le Congo-Brazzaville en Afrique centrale, au pire de sa crise économique vit une nouvelle crise : la pandémie dite COVID-19. Au regard des mesures prises sur ce continent,...

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We Must Tackle and Dismantle Systemic Racism and White Supremacy.

Guest blog by Dr. Bathseba Opini, Assistant Professor of Teaching, The University of British Columbia

The exploitation, control and violence against Black people in the Americas is not a new phenomenon. We have seen the world of Black people worsen each day, month, year, decade, and century. The events of May 25, 2020 were another breaking point in the long history of Black oppression by systems and structures controlled predominantly by white people. George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, was murdered in cold blood by Derek Chauvin – a white police officer in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Black people have been punching bags of racist white police officers and white systems for centuries. Black people have been pinned down for ages by white systems which empower white people like Chauvin to use a knee to neck tactic to restrain Floyd. Anti-Black racism must be understood as different from racism, which is a systemic reality; killing, institutionalized abuse and...

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Indigenous knowledges and inclusivity: understanding the challenges before science.

Guest blog by Julien Commanda, a member of the Anishinaabe people, currently studying at Carleton University in Communications and Media.

When I was invited by the Federation to attend the Canadian Science Policy Conference and write about my experience and thoughts, I found it rather intriguing. For me, "science" meant what they call "hard science" (e.g. Math, Physics, Chemistry, Earth Sciences), which came in contrast to my Social Sciences background and particular interest in Indigenous Studies. As a young Anishinaabe man, the interest in Indigenous Studies did not happen by accident ― it is a field that allowed me to learn a lot about myself and to tap into my intellectual curiosities and passion. Once I read about the conference and got a glimpse into its program, I began to understand that "science policy" is actually inclusive of all sciences,...

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Beyond a Single Story: Black Lives and Hidden Figures in the Canadian Academy

photo of Dr. Malinda S. Smith standing in front of bookcase wearing redGuest blog by Dr. Malinda S. Smith, a Professor of Political Science and a 2018 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow at the University of Alberta, a former Executive member (Equity & Diversity) on the FHSS Board, coauthor of The Equity Myth (2017), and a coeditor of the forthcoming book, The Nuances of Blackness in the Canadian Academy.

As Congress 2020 undertakes to “Bridge Divides” and confront the intersections of colonialism and anti-Black racism, it is critical to confront the histories and multiplicity of Black lives in Canada. As Desmond Cole’s new book reminds us, Black lives are neither reducible to “...

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