Research

SSH News: Op-ed by Antonia Maioni, SSHRC Impact Awards, Trudeau Fellowships, Transatlantic Science Week

 

Antonia Maioni: Arts graduates are best prepared for the unexpected

An op-ed by Federation president Antonia Maioni in The Globe and Mail challenges the notion of the outdated BA. Maioni reflects on the contemporary, cross-disciplinary BA which offers students a solid preparation for the future of work.

SSHRC Impact Awards

SSHRC has announced the finalists for its Impact Awards, which recognize outstanding achievements among humanities and social science research that has received SSHRC funding. The finalists fall under four award categories: Talent, Insight,...

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SSH News: hitchBOT completes its journey, World University rankings, Vanier and Banting recipients announced

 

hitchBOT completes its journey

hitchBOT the hitchhiking robot, created by communication professors David Smith (McMaster) and Frauke Zeller (Ryerson), has completed its journey from Halifax to Victoria. We took the opportunity to speak to the professors about the influence of the humanities and social sciences in the hitchBOT project. Blog post and full interview can be found here.

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SSH News: PSE funding in Ontario and Quebec, the value of SSH in science education, and SSH research in media

 

This week in SSH News, Ontario and Québec are both looking towards a more specialized, targeted funding model for institutions of public secondary education. In Ontario, the government unveiled a plan detailing a new funding strategy for universities and colleges, which will force each institution to pick areas of focus and accept that it cannot have it all. The Globe and Mail writes that “[t]he deals are a crucial step in the province’s plan to tailor the postsecondary system more closely to the economy, and save public money by avoiding duplication.”

In Québec, Minister of Education, Recreation and Sport, Yves Bolduc,...

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SSH News: Fables and moral lessons, rap and racism in Québec, and the Ivy League debate reaches Canada

 

This week in SSH News, children’s stories and fables are the subject of research. At the University of Toronto, psychologist Kang Lee put three well-known tales that involve a main character lying to the test when he asked, do they actually teach children not to lie? The moral of his research, perhaps most useful to parents, teachers, and anyone trying to teach children a lesson about honesty, is that it actually depends on how the consequences of lying are presented.

Meanwhile, researchers in Australia have developed a...

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Sociologist Irene Bloemraad Speaks about Immigration in Canada

 

Nour Aoude, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Recent changes to immigration law in Canada drew criticism from legal and human rights groups, reminding us that immigration policy is an ongoing and heated conversation in which we all have a stake. In order to engage in this conversation as effectively as possible, it is important to benefit from the opinion of expert researchers on Canadian immigration.

What are the unique strengths of Canada’s immigration policy? How do we stack up against the US and other immigrant-attracting countries? Is our system beginning to show cracks? These are the questions that Irene Bloemraad,...

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SSH News: Public intellectuals, open access & high APCs, and a hitchhiking robot

Have academics lost the arts of rhetoric and public engagement? Is engaging the public a part of their mandate at all? These questions were implicitly raised in essayist Scott McLemee’s overview of communication professor Anna M. Young’s book Prophets, Gurus, and Pundits: Rhetorical Styles and Public Engagement, which examines different types of public intellectuals. McLemee’s tongue-in-cheek piece, which promises to be part of a series, has not provided answers one way or another, but simply raising these questions is sure to pull in strong opinions from academics across the spectrum.

One such opinion comes from Tim Hitchcock, Professor of Digital History at the University of Sussex (UK...

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Congress-Inspired Development

 

Daniel Heidt, Co-Founder, Waterloo Innovations

The 2014 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences was a terrific opportunity for start-up companies, like Waterloo Innovations, to showcase their products. Most academics at Congress were unfamiliar with our product, Confero. For readers who may have missed our booth, Confero uses QR codes to automate the process of organizing hundreds or thousands of research photographs into neat file directories and multi-page pdfs. For $25 it can reduce hours of manually sorting research photographs into minutes of keyboard time.

Congress provided Waterloo Innovations with an unparalleled opportunity to solicit feedback from academics, and we are currently in the process of integrating these comments into Confero 2.0. New features will include a single-...

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SSH News: Financial aid, health care policy, and Canada-Quebec relations

This week, student financial aid made headlines in Canada and the UK, for different reasons. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives published a report on July 17th comparing student eligibility for financial aid and the complexity of application processes across provinces. Discussing highlights from the report, with a focus on Ontario, the Toronto Star writes that, in addition to confusing students and their parents, current financial aid systems “do little to guarantee equity among students.”

Financial aid is also causing worries in the UK, where a group of MPs...

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A new imagination - Catherine Dauvergne and the new politics of immigration

Samara Bissonnette

In an installment of the Big Thinking series for Congress 2014, Catherine Dauvergne delivered one of her newest big ideas yesterday at Brock University in a presentation titled "The End of Settler Societies and the New Politics of Immigration". As a member of The Trudeau Foundation, which was founded in 2001 in tribute to the humanitarian virtues of Pierre Trudeau himself, Dauvergne acts as a pro-bono lawyer, a teacher, and a student of research herself, as she researches a new understanding of the politics of immigration around the world, with particular attention to our Canadian home. As a professor, she imparts advice and assistance to young scholars in her field and maintains the belief that "to really do justice to a big idea, you need time more than anything else", to which she added that "the Trudeau Foundation is a gift of time" to her...

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