Interculturalism and pluralism

Soundscaping COVID-19: Experiential learning in a floating and then quarantined classroom

Guest blog by Shumaila Hemani, Ph.D in Music from the University of Alberta and Instructor at the Faculty of Extension, University of Alberta.

In what ways can we adapt our teaching in times of crisis to exhibit resilience such that the arts we teach inspire and empower students to act, especially in times of stress and crisis, and nurture their right to imagination?  I was part of the Music faculty at the Semester at Sea’s Spring 2020 voyage that abruptly ended a month early as a result of COVID-19.  I responded to the loss in experiential learning opportunities as a result of cancellation of the students’ field-classes in South Africa by bringing forward my own artistic practice and research at...

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Nostalgia as medicine: Music and resilience during COVID-19 in Iran

Guest blog by Siavash Rokni, a teacher, researcher, musician and doctoral candidate in communication at UQAM.

I am an Iranian-Canadian-Quebecois doctoral candidate in Communication and lecturer in History of Communication at Université de Québec à Montréal (UQAM). I am also a musician: I play classical flute and jazz saxophone and compose ensemble music. My thesis focuses on how Talfighi (fusion) music in Iran has navigated its place in the Iranian musical panorama since the post-Khatami era.

A couple of weeks ago, I spoke to a friend in southern Italy who is currently in quarantine due to the...

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Le français vue de chaque côté : une conversation entre deux membres de notre équipe de communication à l’occasion de la journée internationale de la Francophonie

Pour encourager chacun à réfléchir à son lien avec la langue française, nous avons demandé à deux de nos collaboratrices bilingues de parler de leur expérience: l'une dont la langue maternelle est le français, l'autre qui parle le français comme langue seconde. Bonne journée internationale de la Francophonie !

Géraldine Gautier: Née et élevée à Paris, je me suis établie au Canada il y a 21 ans. Quand je repense aux facteurs qui m’ont conduits à vivre ici, il y en a eu beaucoup. Sans doute l’un marquant a été d’abord mon environnement familial porté sur d’autres cultures et langues étrangères. J’habite Ottawa depuis 1999 mais j’ai fait une parenthèse de 5 ans dans la région de Toronto. Une chance car grâce à cette dernière expérience, j’ai vraiment réalisé que le bilinguisme et la Francophonie ne...

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Knowledge to action on International Women’s Day

 

Sue Szabo, Director, Social and Economic Policy, International Development Research Centre (IDRC) 

Research is crucial to understanding the barriers to women’s empowerment and their deeper causes. To mark International Women’s Day today, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is holding the event Knowledge to Action: Improving Women’s Lives. As director of Inclusive Economies, I will have the pleasure of welcoming seven panelists who will highlight the knowledge generated by IDRC-supported research teams on two crucial issues for women: economic empowerment and ending violence. 
 
Governments and the private sector around the world encourage...

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We Are Coming Home: Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence

Robert R. Janes, independent scholar

We Are Coming Home: Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence (Athabasca University Press) is an unusual book in the museum world – not only because it’s about the unconditional return of sacred objects, but also because five of the eight contributors are Blackfoot ceremonialists or spiritual leaders. Although the idea for the book was the result of a restaurant conversation, it is actually the culmination of an evolving, 10-year relationship between the Glenbow Museum (Calgary, Alberta) and the four First Nations of the Blackfoot Confederacy – a process of reciprocity, deepening understanding, and mutual appreciation.  The editor of this volume,...

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Who is telling our stories? Canadian millennials in literature and the humanities

 

Kofi Hope, Rhodes Scholar, Doctor of Philosophy in Politics & Managing Director, Community Empowering Enterprises

On July 14, Go Set a Watchman will be released to the general public, a sequel of sorts to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.  Few works of literature have had a more profound role in shaping conversations on race in the 20th century than To Kill a Mockingbird

For my part, I read the book in 1999 as a grade 10 student in Mississauga.  While undoubtedly a classic novel, To Kill a Mockingbird...

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Caring Across Boundaries at Congress

Andrea Auger, Reconciliation and Research Manager, First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada

The First Nations Child and Family Caring Society (the Caring Society) is thrilled to be a part of the 2015 Congress for the Humanities and Social Sciences. We invite attendees to see the “Caring Across Boundaries” photo exhibition that brings viewers closer to the lived realities and aspirations of three First Nations communities: Attawapiskat First Nation (Ontario), Carrier Sekani Nations (British Columbia) and Tobique First Nation (New Brunswick). Seen through the lens of internationally renowned photographer Liam Sharp, members of the First Nations invite people to take positive steps towards reconciliation and a future of wellbeing for First Nations and all children and youth in Canada.

Caring Across Boundaries has...

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"The Nuances of Blackness and/in the Canadian Academy" – A tool for engaging with equity pedagogy in the graduate classroom

Author: Dolana Mogadime, Associate Professor, Brock University

Over the past few years, I have used the Federation for the Humanities and Social Science’s Equity Matters blog series as a teaching tool for my graduate level courses in education.  The Federation’s blog is an excellent mechanism for community building and knowledge exchange.  It provides scholars who are committed to theoretical and critical research with a wealth of public, open access materials to share with students. These materials, in the form of panel presentations, online discussions and posts, provide a way for students to step into equity conversations and engage with them.

"The Nuances of Blackness and/in...

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An Easy, Inexpensive Solution for Simultaneous Translation

Kate Mulcrone, Convene magazine

This article originally appeared in Convene, magazine of the Professional Convention Management Association.

As associations continue to grow their international membership, simultaneous translation at events is moving from a nice-to-have to a must-have feature — even as translation can be expensive and a logistical headache. But Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences Manager of Congress Terry D’Angelo has found a simple, low-cost solution.

Because her organization is headquartered in Ottawa, in bilingual Canada, simultaneous...

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