Gender equity

Saying "yes" to women experts: Informed Opinions advances women's expertise during a time of increased inequality

Lily Polowin, Digital Communications Officer at the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

You may have read the headlines: women with children have been getting pushed out of the workforce due to childcare demands during the pandemic; women have been submitting fewer articles for publication in academic journals since the start of the pandemic; and even when promoted to the second highest position in government, women’s qualifications still come under suspicion. It’s a well-established fact that global crises don’t affect everyone...

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What does International Women's Day mean to you? Federation staff perspectives.

Lily Polowin, Communications Coordinator at the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Federation currently has 18 staff members, 14 of which are women. Being part of a team of strong women inspires me daily, and so this International Women’s Day, I wanted to probe my colleagues to see what empowering thoughts were blooming within. I asked staff if they’d be interested in answering this question: What does International Women’s Day mean to you? Here are the answers I received. Enjoy, and Happy International Women’s Day!

Lamis El-Zein, Executive Assistant:

International Women’s Day is an opportunity to celebrate girls and women all over the word, and to honour those who...

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The Trans Generation: How Trans Kids (and Their Parents) Are Creating a Gender Revolution

Guest blog by Ann Travers, Associate Professor of Sociology at Simon Fraser University

My research with and on behalf of trans and gender nonconforming kids brings my personal experience together with my scholarship in a particularly powerful way. I was a gender nonconforming kid and experienced very harsh gender policing. I now identify as trans non-binary and wish there had been more options when I was growing up. My own experience really influenced my efforts as a parent to keep people from imposing gender categories and norms on my own children. This often felt like a losing battle, as people and institutions are relentless when it comes to dividing children into girl and boy categories and attempting to restrict the...

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Where Are Women Safe? Some Thoughts on International Women’s Day

Naila Keleta-MaeAssistant Professor, Theatre and Performance Program, University of Waterloo

*Below is an excerpt from a talk prepared as the Distinguished Guest Speaker at the University of Waterloo’s 2017 International Women’s Day Dinner.

November 9, 2016:
The morning after Donald J. Trump is elected President of the United States of America. A white male colleague enters my office with tears in his eyes. He asks, “How are you doing?” I reply, “It’s a...

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Knowledge to action on International Women’s Day

 

Sue Szabo, Director, Social and Economic Policy, International Development Research Centre (IDRC) 

Research is crucial to understanding the barriers to women’s empowerment and their deeper causes. To mark International Women’s Day today, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is holding the event Knowledge to Action: Improving Women’s Lives. As director of Inclusive Economies, I will have the pleasure of welcoming seven panelists who will highlight the knowledge generated by IDRC-supported research teams on two crucial issues for women: economic empowerment and ending violence. 
 
Governments and the private sector around the world encourage...

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Why are we still debating diversity versus merit in 2015?

 

Susan Franceschet, University of Calgary; Karen Beckwith, Case Western Reserve University; Claire Annesley, University of Sussex

Canada’s first gender-equal cabinet is being celebrated by equality and diversity advocates but criticized by those who believe that using selection criteria like gender, race, or ethnicity violates merit. Those who trumpet merit believe that selection to high-level positions like cabinet or corporate boards must be based on demonstrable skills, achievements, and credentials with no consideration of the other characteristics of the individuals holding those credentials. In fact, critics of quotas as a mechanism to ensure diversity go a step further, arguing that quotas will lead to the selection of less qualified...

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A unique Canadian invention: 84th Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

Jean-Marc Mangin and Nour Aoude, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Some things change…

It can be hard to imagine that Congress, a meeting of more than 8,000 scholars and researchers, started when a handful of Canadian learned societies began exploring the idea of hosting their annual meetings at the same place, at the same time. In fact, there is evidence of this happening as early as 1922. Early players like the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA), the Canadian Historical Society (now the Canadian Historical Association) and the Royal Society took the lead on this through the 1930s and 40s, calling themselves the ‘Learneds’. This may sound very grand, but our best estimates suggest that the whole population of humanists and social...

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Global sustainable development goals have potential to drive change in Canada

Shannon Kindornay, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University

There is no question that 2015 is a year for change both within Canada and abroad. As noted by Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation, in her blog on Canada’s engagement with global social justice, not only are Canadians facing an election year in 2015, but changes are afoot on the global stage. This year, governments will negotiate a set of universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the United Nations to replace the Millennium Development Goals that will expire at the end of 2015. These goals will apply to all countries, including Canada, and...

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Les femmes et le terrorisme

Nathalie Des Rosiers, Université d’Ottawa

Partout dans le monde, on s’efforce d’inventer des solutions juridiques pour mettre fin au terrorisme.   Le Canda ne fait pas exception : un projet de loi propose des détentions préventives,  un partage d’information entre agences et un mandat au service de renseignements « d’agir » pour prévenir des attaques.  Le public est prêt à accepter ces mesures sans précédent parce qu’ils ont peur de ces attaques féroces imprévisibles qu’on voit sur YouTube et à la télé.

La violence faite aux femmes, la disparition ou le meurtre d’une centaine de femmes autochtones ne suscitent pas le...

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A pivotal year for Canada’s engagement with global social justice

Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC)

February 20th is World Day of Social Justice, as recognized by the United Nations since 2007. The day is a call to observe social justice by supporting “efforts of the international community in poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all”.  

Three events make 2015 a pivotal year for global social justice: first, there is the 20th anniversary and review of the Beijing...

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