Federal policy

Stephen Toope: How sound science policy can make Ottawa better

 

This op-ed was published in The Hill Times on November 2, 2015

Stephen Toope, President, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences; Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

The new government will soon take office, carrying with it the hopes of a broad range of Canadians. And for those of us who value scientific research—either because we use it in our professional lives or simply because we value its role in a modern knowledge society—there are many reasons to be optimistic.

The role of science in democracy, good policy and government was an important...

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Knowledge matters in our election

Joan Sangster, President, Canadian Historical Association and Stephen Toope, President, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Following five televised leaders’ debates in the 2015 Canadian federal election, Joan Sangster, President of the Canadian Historical Association and Stephen Toope, President of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences weigh in on the critical but often overlooked role of expert research, knowledge production and reliable evidence in shaping our understanding of the urgent political issues debated during elections.

Ah, nothing like election debates to demonstrate just how contested “facts” can be. In all five debates to date, party leaders backed up their assertions with facts, each claiming that only they have...

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Pre-budget 2016 submission: Investments needed in research, student mobility, and in support of reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples

 

Each year, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance asks Canadians to identify their priorities for the upcoming federal budget. In response, the Federation puts forward recommendations pertaining to the social science and humanities community, noting ways in which federal funding could bolster these disciplines, research, scholars and students.

The Standing Committee on Finance renewed its annual summer call for submissions to feed into Budget 2016, but halted the process when Parliament was dissolved on August 2, 2015. We have posted our initial budget submission document here to inform members and stakeholders of the three key priorities that need Government attention: investing in research, creating opportunities for student mobility, and supporting Reconciliation, which includes improving access to post-secondary education...

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SSH News: April 23, 2015 (Budget Edition)

 

This week, SSH News is focusing on the response to the federal budget announcement by different groups and individuals in Canadian higher education and the media. Cette semaine, SSH News se concentre sur la réponse à l'annonce du budget fédéral par différents groupes et individus dans l'enseignement supérieur et les médias au Canada: 

Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences | Fédération des sciences humaines
Federal budget 2015 invests in research and innovation | Le budget fédéral 2015 investit dans la...

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Global sustainable development goals have potential to drive change in Canada

Shannon Kindornay, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University

There is no question that 2015 is a year for change both within Canada and abroad. As noted by Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation, in her blog on Canada’s engagement with global social justice, not only are Canadians facing an election year in 2015, but changes are afoot on the global stage. This year, governments will negotiate a set of universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the United Nations to replace the Millennium Development Goals that will expire at the end of 2015. These goals will apply to all countries, including Canada, and...

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Canada can learn from the UK’s “The Business of People” report

Nour Aoude, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Released by the UK’s Campaign for Social Science  on February 24, 2015, “The Business of People” report underscores the critical role that social science research should play in the that country’s science and innovation strategy. The report’s release comes two months after the UK government’s December 2014 announcement of its science and innovation policy. While the policy clarifies that “science” is used to encompass “the natural, physical and social sciences, engineering, technology, the arts and humanities”, there is...

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Les femmes et le terrorisme

Nathalie Des Rosiers, Université d’Ottawa

Partout dans le monde, on s’efforce d’inventer des solutions juridiques pour mettre fin au terrorisme.   Le Canda ne fait pas exception : un projet de loi propose des détentions préventives,  un partage d’information entre agences et un mandat au service de renseignements « d’agir » pour prévenir des attaques.  Le public est prêt à accepter ces mesures sans précédent parce qu’ils ont peur de ces attaques féroces imprévisibles qu’on voit sur YouTube et à la télé.

La violence faite aux femmes, la disparition ou le meurtre d’une centaine de femmes autochtones ne suscitent pas le...

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A pivotal year for Canada’s engagement with global social justice

Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC)

February 20th is World Day of Social Justice, as recognized by the United Nations since 2007. The day is a call to observe social justice by supporting “efforts of the international community in poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all”.  

Three events make 2015 a pivotal year for global social justice: first, there is the 20th anniversary and review of the Beijing...

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Once Again, Without Data

Jason Haslam, President, Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE)

It has become a common complaint, across the board, that statistics relating to Canadian higher education are sorely lacking or, when they do exist, are misleading–ACCUTE past-president Stephen Slemon has written about this matter on this very blog. Whether it’s in terms of faculty hiring (and of what sorts), student outcome, or relative growth in funding and expenditures between capital projects, administration, and teaching, we’re operating with few details, and often with far fewer facts to work with than our American cousins have at their disposal. Of course, we can still learn from some of those American data points, but we do have to keep the multiple different...

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Good Science Policy Will Require Good Communication and Better Support: A Night Out With CAUT

Matthew McKean, Policy Analyst, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

In what turns out to have been the run up to the unveiling of the federal government’s new Science, Technology, and Innovation Strategy (ST&I), the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) launched its “Get Science Right” campaign. The goal of the November 27 town hall was to “lay the groundwork for a new direction for science policy” and much of what was discussed was emphatically relevant to the humanities and social sciences community.

Moderated by science journalist Mike De Souza, the evening event took the form of a lively discussion among panelists, including Diane Beauchemin, Chemistry...

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