Federal budget

2017 pre-budget submission: Research drives innovation and growth


As part of the federal government’s pre-budget consultation process, the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences is recommending significant investments to strengthen research, experiential learning and Indigenous academic inclusion. Read our full submission here.

Canada depends on a strong research ecosystem to prosper in a fast-changing knowledge economy. Budget 2016 made some important contributions to strengthening that system, and this important work must continue. The Federation believes that by strengthening Canada’s education and research systems, we can produce the new knowledge and talented workforce Canada will need to achieve long-term equitable growth. To succeed, we will need to tackle three key challenges:

1: Ensure a high performing and globally connected Canadian research ecosystem

While Canadian researchers continues to rank highly compared to their...

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Budget 2016 signals important research and innovation discussions coming in 2016


Here at the Federation, we’ve been picking apart the 2016 federal budget and also keeping an eye out for what our colleagues are saying. There seems to be a solid consensus growing: March 22 was a good day for Canadian scholarship in its many forms.

The Federation’s overall impressions are articulated in our post-budget media release, and a detailed analysis of the budget is available in our 2016 budget briefing note. The following is a brief overview of a few key topics, including issues that we feel are likely to be highly relevant in the coming year.

The 2015 Liberal election platform had no specific promises relating to research funding, so it was a welcome surprise to see a funding increase of $95 million split between the...

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Canada needs a Chief Research and Knowledge Advisor


It has been exciting to see the Canadian government make progress on its knowledge agenda, beginning with the reinstatement of the long-form census. The Federation is thrilled to be participating in another exciting development: the creation of a new senior research advisor in the federal government. The Federation recently submitted its recommendations to Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan for the creation of a Chief Research and Knowledge Advisor.

In their 2015 election campaign, the Liberal party committed to creating a new Chief Science Officer. As a new government, they’ve so far followed through on that promise, with the prime minister mandating Minister Duncan to create the post. The Federation strongly supports this project, and we have submitted a set of recommendations that we feel can help make Canada’s research-advisory system the best in...

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Pre-budget 2016 submission: The Federation calls for investments in research, in student mobility, and to support reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples

In this year’s budget season, the Federation is urging the federal government to make significant investments to support scholarly research, student mobility and reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians through the postsecondary system.

Each year, the Federation submits a set of recommendations to the federal government through the annual budget consultation process. Our recommendations are designed to reflect the priorities of Canada’s social scientists and humanities scholars, and also to support public policies that benefit all Canadians.

Our recommendations for 2016 are based on the understanding that Canadians face growing challenges in the 21st century, such as adapting to technological change, creating jobs in an increasingly knowledge-driven economy, reducing carbon emissions and building social inclusion. As a response to these challenges, we are making the following recommendations:

Invest in research:...

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Pre-budget 2016 submission: Investments needed in research, student mobility, and in support of reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples


Each year, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance asks Canadians to identify their priorities for the upcoming federal budget. In response, the Federation puts forward recommendations pertaining to the social science and humanities community, noting ways in which federal funding could bolster these disciplines, research, scholars and students.

The Standing Committee on Finance renewed its annual summer call for submissions to feed into Budget 2016, but halted the process when Parliament was dissolved on August 2, 2015. We have posted our initial budget submission document here to inform members and stakeholders of the three key priorities that need Government attention: investing in research, creating opportunities for student mobility, and supporting Reconciliation, which includes improving access to post-secondary education...

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SSH News: April 23, 2015 (Budget Edition)


This week, SSH News is focusing on the response to the federal budget announcement by different groups and individuals in Canadian higher education and the media. Cette semaine, SSH News se concentre sur la réponse à l'annonce du budget fédéral par différents groupes et individus dans l'enseignement supérieur et les médias au Canada: 

Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences | Fédération des sciences humaines
Federal budget 2015 invests in research and innovation | Le budget fédéral 2015...

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SSH News: Congress 2014 blog series, 2015 Federal budget, Consultations on open access and the ASPP

The Federation’s June Communiqué was released yesterday. The following are some of the highlights from this month and last.

This year, we hired a fantastic group of writers to contribute to our 2014 Congress blog series. They attended association meetings, community programs, and special events, and provided us with some engaging and insightful chronicles of Congress. With a range of personal interests, the team managed to highlight research from across disciplines. The bloggers shared their experiences attending events like Tim Cook's Big Thinking lecture on the culture of death among Canadian soldiers in WWI, film night...

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SSH News: Big Thinking, Canada’s Innovation Challenge, AAAS 2014

This month’s Big Thinking lecture presented by Joseph Heath, Director, Centre for Ethics, and Professor, Department of Philosophy and School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto, is now available to view online. This lecture addressed "reason versus passion" in politics and what we are sacrificing when we allow our political system to be dominated by appeals to passion rather than reason. The event was also captured in an article in The Hill Times this week: U of T prof calls for Enlightenment 2.0 to combat environment of ‘truthiness’ (available by...

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SSH News: Big Thinking, Federal Budget 2014, SSHRC Impact Awards

The most recent Big Thinking lecture "Reason versus passion in politics" was presented on Tuesday by Joseph Heath, Director, Centre for Ethics, and Professor, Department of Philosophy and School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto. This lecture addressed "reason versus passion" in politics and what we are sacrificing when we allow our political system to be dominated by appeals to passion rather than reason. Léo Charbonneau, editor at University Affairs, reflected on Heath's talk in his article “Emotion should not rule over reason in politics” (University Affairs).

And just maybe, reason in politics did prevail this week… To the...

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Highlights from the federal budget

The federal budget was announced earlier today. 

“The investments announced today —and taken together, they are significant and represent the largest increase in funding through the granting councils in a decade— will lead to crucial research advances to address challenges to Canadian society, as well as equip graduates with the critical thinking and creative skills needed to contribute to the knowledge society," stated Antonia Maioni, President of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Read the Federation's media release here.


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