Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Power to Change: Leadership, community and resiliency

 

Zahura Ahmed, Congress 2016 student blogger

“Aho Mitayyuke Oyasin.” Mayor Naheed Nenshi greeted a full auditorium of Congress attendees with a traditional Indigenous greeting: “greetings to all of my relations.” This phrase, taken from the Lakota language, emphasizes the oneness and entwinement of society. Nenshi used the importance of this concept to deliver a gripping lecture on creating prosperous, resilient and functioning communities. He emphasized the necessity of people from all walks of life to work together in order to make good ideas a reality within their communities.

As arguably the most well-liked mayor in Canada, Nenshi was in a good position to speak on this matter. Recounting a tough moment in Calgary’s history, Nenshi told of his experience in responding to the 2013 floods in the city. A few facts that highlight the severity of this include: the Elbow River usually flows 30-40 cubic metres per second and at the time of the...

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Vaudeville as a form of indigenous self-expression

 

Caleb Snider, Congress 2016 student blogger

What do you think of when you hear or read Vaudeville? Nostalgia for a simpler time of gas-lamp lit stage productions? A smile at the thought of the slapstick, episodic comedies that gave rise to early cinema and classic cartoons? Or maybe more problematic images such as the racialized minstrel shows?

I’m willing to bet you wouldn’t have thought of Vaudeville as a space where indigenous performers could practice greater autonomy, self-determination and identity building than in any other venue available at the time. But this was one of the central points of Christine Bold’s fascinating lecture, “Indigenous Modernities: From Wild West to Vaudeville.”

Professor Bold (University of Guelph) described some of the results of her ongoing project to recover a hidden history in which native performers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries used the Vaudeville stage to construct modern indigiocity....

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'The Container' theatre performance at Congress is innovative and fresh

 

Caleb Snider, Congress 2016 student blogger

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2016 is about more than groundbreaking academic panels and innovative keynote speakers; it’s also about showcasing cultural events organized by the University of Calgary School of Creative and Performing Arts (SCPA). The first of these performances is an excerpt of the play The Container by Clare Bayley, directed and designed by University of Calgary MFA graduate students Azri Ali and Michael Sinnott.

Mr. Sinnott’s stage design features a wood and plexiglass replica of a standard shipping container wherein three female refugees, desperate to reach safety in Britain, must contend with an antagonistic agent working to smuggle them across the border—for a price. Placed on either side of the container, in a format that Mr. Sinnott describes as a “parliamentary stage” (political implication definitely intended), the audience is forced to contend not...

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Congress in the news - May 28

 

Congress 2016: Pseudolus

CBC

This weekend you've got a chance to see an ancient Roman play -- first performed way back in 191 B.C -- at a baseball diamond at Foothills Stadium. Clem Martini is the Chair of the U of C's drama department...

University of Calgary to host an inside scoop on Canadian politics

The Globe and Mail

It is often described as the academic Olympics, but the upcoming Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences that runs for the next week at the University of Calgary is...

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The 2016 Calgary Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada: Some thoughts on the university as a community

Guy Laforest, President-Elect of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor, Departement of Political Science, Université Laval

This blog was published on Guy Laforest's website on May 25th, 2016

The University of Calgary, placed at the foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, will be the host, from May 28 to June 3, 2016, of the congress of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. More than 8,000 participants, representing over 70 scholarly associations in the great family of the humanities and the social sciences will hold their annual meeting in the economic metropolis of Alberta, united around a federating topic: energizing communities. In a country as immense as Canada, these meetings enable...

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Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship: The Evolving Role of the Professor

By Stephen Higham, M.A. - Policy Analyst

Universities have always been essential contributors to their communities. But they are increasingly being turned to as resources to resolve pressing social and economic challenges in the communities they serve, and as important bridges between the academy and these communities.

These professors play an essential (but often underappreciated) role within in Canada’s innovation ecosystem. Not only do they produce original research, lead major projects, and contribute to the day-to-day administration of our universities, they also provide mentorship to the next generation of thinkers and entrepreneurs.

There are nearly 17,000 professors in Canada across a range of disciplines, and they are the backbone of what is arguably our greatest strength as an innovative nation: research excellence. Canada is among the...

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