Canada Prizes

Canada Prizes 2015: Jean-Paul Sartre’s American dream

Daniel Drolet

Jean-Paul Sartre, an influential French writer, philosopher and politically active intellectual in the mid-20th century, was fascinated by the United States.

A new book by Yan Hamel, a professor of literature at TÉLUQ, Quebec’s distance-learning university, analyzes that fascination and the effect it had on French opinion and political discourse, particularly on the left.

“Sartre set the agenda for discourse about the U.S. among left-wing French intellectuals after the Second World War,” says Hamel, adding that this was one of the reasons he decided to research the topic.

Hamel’s book, L’Amérique selon Sartre : littérature, philosophie,...

Read more »

Canada Prizes 2015: Treaties with native peoples ‘our Magna Carta,’ says professor

Daniel Drolet

Michael Asch says the real defining moment in Canadian history was not Confederation, but the day the first treaty was signed between European settlers and the country’s Indigenous peoples.

And he is inviting Canadians to rethink the way we look at the country’s past by paying more attention to the treaties that are at the base of the coexistence between this country’s Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

Asch, an anthropologist, has won the 2015 Canada Prize in the Social Sciences for his book On Being Here to Stay: Treaties and Aboriginal Rights in Canada. The prize is awarded by the Federation for the...

Read more »

Canada Prizes 2015: The art of re-complicating history

Daniel Drolet

Native Art of the Northwest Coast: A History of Changing Ideas is, at over 1,000 pages, a very thick book.

Charlotte Townsend-Gault, one of the book’s three editors, says she doesn’t expect people to sit down and read it cover to cover. But in some ways, she adds, that’s kind of the point.

Townsend-Gault says she wanted to get away from the idea that native art – and the relations between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples of Canada – is a simple and straightforward concept. It is only by embracing its complexity and its contradictions that we can come to understand it. And sometimes, that’s best done bit by bit,...

Read more »

As heard at the 2014 Canada Prizes awards ceremony

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences announced the winners of the 2014 Canada Prizes on April 30. The Canada Prizes are awarded annually to the best scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences that have received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program.

During the awards ceremony on Wednesday, May 7, 2014 at York University’s Glendon College in Toronto, each of the winners was interviewed about their celebrated work. Be sure to listen to their interviews now!

 

Canada Prize in the Humanities
Sandra Djwa, for Journey With No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page...

Read more »

Sometimes it is enough to simply be excellent

Guest post by Michael Adams The Environics Institute and Environics Research Group

The following is a speech given by Michael Adams at the 2014 Canada Prizes award ceremony at York University’s Glendon College Campus on May 7, 2014, where the Federation celebrated this year’s four winners.

Good evening, everyone. It is an honour for me to have been asked to be deliver the keynote address for this year’s Canada Prize Awards, especially as I served on the jury with two distinguished scholars: Janice Stein of the University of Toronto’s Munk School and professor Greg...

Read more »

SSH News: Farley Mowat, Canada Prizes award ceremony, Hot button issues in higher education

It is with a heavy heart that Canada says goodbye to Farley Mowat, a literary great and passionate Canadian. Mowat passed away, yesterday, at the age of 92. “Mowat, author of dozens of works including Lost in the Barrens and Never Cry Wolf, introduced Canada to readers around the world and shared everything from his time abroad during the Second World War, to his travels in the North and his concern for the deteriorating environment,” writes the CBC.

In much brighter news from the Canadian literary scene, the Federation was honoured to award the four winners of the 2014 Canada Prizes at a gala held yesterday at York University...

Read more »

Adrien Arcand, Ernst Zundel and anti-Semitism

Prix du Canada

By Daniel Drolet

Les chemises bleues : Adrien Arcand, journaliste antisémite canadien-françaisA new book on Canadian journalist Adrien Arcand details his involvement in the rise of Holocaust deniers around the world.

In fact, says author Hughes Théorêt, Arcand was a mentor to Ernst Zundel, a prominent German-Canadian Holocaust denier.

Théorêt’s study, Les chemises bleues : Adrien Arcand, journaliste...

Read more »

Canada’s opposition critical to its stability

Canada Prizes

By Daniel Drolet

Across the Aisle: Opposition in Canadian PoliticsCanada’s parliamentary system is in good shape, and its opposition is generally healthy, says a professor who has just completed a major study of opposition in Canada.

But David E. Smith, author of Across the Aisle: Opposition in Canadian Politics, warns that our political system, like a good relationship, needs constant nurturing to remain...

Read more »

Pages