Anti-racism

Who is telling our stories? Canadian millennials in literature and the humanities

 

Kofi Hope, Rhodes Scholar, Doctor of Philosophy in Politics & Managing Director, Community Empowering Enterprises

On July 14, Go Set a Watchman will be released to the general public, a sequel of sorts to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.  Few works of literature have had a more profound role in shaping conversations on race in the 20th century than To Kill a Mockingbird

For my part, I read the book in 1999 as a grade 10 student in Mississauga.  While...

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Global sustainable development goals have potential to drive change in Canada

Shannon Kindornay, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University

There is no question that 2015 is a year for change both within Canada and abroad. As noted by Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation, in her blog on Canada’s engagement with global social justice, not only are Canadians facing an election year in 2015, but changes are afoot on the global stage. This year, governments will negotiate a set of universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the United Nations to replace the Millennium Development Goals that will expire at the end of 2015. These goals will apply to all countries...

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Caring Across Boundaries at Congress

Andrea Auger, Reconciliation and Research Manager, First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada

The First Nations Child and Family Caring Society (the Caring Society) is thrilled to be a part of the 2015 Congress for the Humanities and Social Sciences. We invite attendees to see the “Caring Across Boundaries” photo exhibition that brings viewers closer to the lived realities and aspirations of three First Nations communities: Attawapiskat First Nation (Ontario), Carrier Sekani Nations (British Columbia) and Tobique First Nation (New Brunswick). Seen through the lens of internationally renowned photographer Liam Sharp, members of the First Nations invite people to take positive steps towards reconciliation and a future of wellbeing for First Nations and all children and youth in Canada.

Caring Across Boundaries has...

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"The Nuances of Blackness and/in the Canadian Academy" – A tool for engaging with equity pedagogy in the graduate classroom

Author: Dolana Mogadime, Associate Professor, Brock University

Over the past few years, I have used the Federation for the Humanities and Social Science’s Equity Matters blog series as a teaching tool for my graduate level courses in education.  The Federation’s blog is an excellent mechanism for community building and knowledge exchange.  It provides scholars who are committed to theoretical and critical research with a wealth of public, open access materials to share with students. These materials, in the form of panel presentations, online discussions and posts, provide a way for students to step into equity conversations and engage with them.

"The...

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Much maligned Monsters: Islam, Immigration, and Islamization

Randip Bakshi http://www.twitter.com/randipbakshi

Doug Saunders taking questions after his Big Thinking lecture at Congress 2013

I must confess this was a session I was very skeptical about. I wondered, as Saunders wondered when writing his book, how someone who subscribes to many of these myths could be objective, let alone compassionate, in his analysis. Objectivity aside, I couldn't help but ask myself if anyone was willing to accept Saunders' criticism of the "Muslim Tide" hypothesis. We live in an age where words like extremism, fundamentalism, and Islamophobia are regular adjectives in our day-to-day vocabulary; how, then, does this book purport to counter the very myths that have largely...

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Academic group supports Chief Spence and Idle No More

idle-no-moreA group of academics have issued an open letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper and to Governor General David Johnston to express their solidarity with Chief Theresa Spence and the Idle No More movement.

The letter can be read online in English, French and Spanish, and the group has also launched a Facebook group, Academics in Solidarity with Chief Theresa Spence, which has more than 1,600 followers.

Today is Day 23 of Chief Spence’s hunger strike. Leader of the Attawapiskat First Nation, she has called on Prime Minister Harper and the Governor General to meet with Aboriginal leaders to “initiate immediate discussions and the...

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Crossroads: Race and Gender in the Canadian Academy – Searching for Equity

Caitlin Stone Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

During the afternoon of May 31, Frances HenryCarol TatorCarl James, and Ena Dua gathered to present their research and findings on the marginalization of racialized faculty in Canadian universities. Research was conducted using personal interviews, surveys, and site visits and the results were not surprising. As Tator explained, universities have been very slow to make positive changes to make their universities a more equitable environment for racialized faculty members. What often occurs is that administrations will pay lip service to equity issues for faculty but no real changes will take place.

The majority of faculty surveyed who identified as a visible minority were...

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Privilege vs. Complicity: People of Colour and Settler Colonialism

Beenash Jafri, York University
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the Equity Issues Portfolio’s series on Indigenizing the academy and Indigenous education.

March 21st marks the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. It is a day to commemorate lives lost during the 1960 Sharpeville Massacre, and to reflect on our contemporary efforts to challenge racism and colonialism. In the spirit of this day, I would like to contribute to the ongoing Equity...

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Resisting Invisibility: Black faculty in Art and Art History in Canada

Charmaine Nelson, McGill University
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the VP Equity Issues series on Black History Month in Canada.

As Black History Month draws to a close and Women’s History Month begins, I am reminded of the importance of my identity as a black female scholar. More specifically, I am a rare breed of Canadian academic, a black female art historian. At the most recent meeting of the Universities Art Association of Canada (UAAC) annual...

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