Media Releases

Knowing who we are: Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences applauds the reinstatement of the long-form census

 

OTTAWA, November 5, 2015 – The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences commends the federal government on the expeditious reinstatement of the mandatory long-form census.

The data collected from the long-form census, with its nearly 94 per cent return rate, produced crucial information for and about Canadians. Last undertaken in 2006, the census provided a factual basis for policy makers, researchers, community groups and business to identify issues, inform debate, track progress or problems, and formulate evidenced-based solutions. The voluntary National Household Survey was not only more costly than the long-form census, but its lower return rate of approximately 68 percent created major information gaps about key populations and rendered data comparisons to earlier years largely impossible.  

“Public and corporate decision-making must be based on accurate and comprehensive data, if we are to have a solid grasp on the true nature of the issues we face as a democratic society,” said Stephen Toope, President of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. “It has been 10 years since we last had a good hard look at ourselves as Canadians. We are now back on track to knowing who we are, in all our diversity. This is essential to building a more prosperous, inclusive future for Canada.”

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Media inquiries:

Nicola Katz
Manager of Communications
Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences
613-238-6112, ext. 351
nkatz@ideas-idees.ca

About the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences has been promoting research, learning and an understanding of the contributions made by the humanities and the social sciences to a free and democratic society for 75 years. Established in 1940, with a membership now comprising over 160 universities, colleges and scholarly associations, the Federation represents a diverse community of 85,000 researchers and graduate students across Canada. The Federation organizes Canada’s largest academic gathering, the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, bringing together more than 8,000 participants each year. For more information about the Federation, visit www.ideas-idees.ca.