Media Releases

Finalists for Canada Prizes announced

Media release

OTTAWA, March 7, 2016 – The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2016 Canada Prizes. The Canada Prizes are awarded annually to the best scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences that have received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP).

Celebrating the best Canadian scholarly books across all the disciplines of the humanities and social sciences, the Canada Prizes are awarded to books that make an exceptional contribution to scholarship, are engagingly written, and enrich the social, cultural and intellectual life of Canada. This year marks the 25th anniversary of these prestigious prizes, first awarded in 1991.

“The humanities and social sciences are fundamentally important disciplines that help us understand ourselves—as individuals, as community members, as a country. The impressive list of 16 finalists for this year’s Canada Prizes demonstrates immense talent and the rich array of research underway in our scholarly community,” said Stephen J. Toope, President of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. “The Federation congratulates these finalists and is honoured to play a role in raising their profile to the Canadian public.”

This year’s finalists are:

Canada Prize in the Humanities

  • Jennifer L. Bonnell, Reclaiming the Don: An Environmental History of Toronto's Don River Valley (University of Toronto Press)
  • Norman Hillmer, O.D. Skelton: A Portrait of Canadian Ambition (University of Toronto Press)
  • Michel Hogue, Metis and the Medicine Line: Creating a Border and Dividing a People (University of Regina Press)
  • Ian Mosby, Food Will Win the War: The Politics, Culture, and Science of Food on Canada's Home Front (UBC Press)
  • Brian Young, Patrician Families and the Making of Quebec: The Taschereaus and McCords (McGill-Queen’s University Press)

Canada Prize in the Social Sciences

  • Chris Andersen, Métis: Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood (UBC Press)
  • Dominique Clément, Equality Deferred: Sex Discrimination and British Columbia's Human Rights State, 1953-84 (UBC Press)
  • Girish Daswani, Looking Back, Moving Forward: Transformation and Ethical Practice in the Ghanaian Church of Pentecost (University of Toronto Press)
  • Nancy Turner, Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America. Volume 1 and Volume 2 (McGill-Queen’s University Press)

Prix du Canada en sciences humaines

  • Caroline Durand, Nourrir la machine humaine : Nutrition et alimentation au Québec, 1860-1945 (McGill-Queen’s University Press)
  • Andrée Rivard, Histoire de l'accouchement dans un Québec moderne (Éditions du remue-ménage)
  • Patricia Smart, De Marie de l'Incarnation à Nelly Arcan : Se dire, se faire par l'écriture intime (Éditions du Boréal)

Prix du Canada en sciences sociales

  • Joel Belliveau, Le «moment 68» et la réinvention de l'Acadie (Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa)
  • Caroline Caron, Vues, mais non entendues. Les adolescentes québécoises et l'hypersexualisation (Presses de l’Université Laval)
  • Olivier Côté, Construire la nation au petit écran : Le Canada, une histoire populaire de CBC/Radio Canada (1995-2002) (Éditions du Septentrion)
  • Linda Kay, Elles étaient seize : Les premières femmes journalistes au Canada (Presses de l’Université de Montréal)

The four winners of the 2016 Canada Prizes will be announced on April 11 and the prizes, each valued at $2,500, will be presented at an awards ceremony to be held during the 2016 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Calgary. 


About the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences
The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences promotes research and teaching for the advancement of an inclusive, democratic and prosperous society. With a membership now comprising over 160 universities, colleges and scholarly associations, the Federation represents a diverse community of 91,000 researchers and graduate students across Canada. The Federation organizes Canada’s largest academic gathering, the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, bringing together more than 8,000 participants each year. 

Media inquiries
Nicola Katz
Manager, Communications
Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences
613-238-6112 ext. 351
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