ASPP and Canada Prizes

ASPP and Canada Prizes

Awards to Scholaraly Publications Program

The Federation is the administrator of the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP), a competitive funding program designed to assist with the publication of scholarly books. Under the program’s mandate to support books of advanced scholarship in the humanities and social sciences that make an important contribution to knowledge, the ASPP contributes 1.5 million dollars to the dissemination of Canadian research annually and has supported the publication of over 7,000 books.

The Federation supports Open Access and has established a policy to actively promote and facilitate Open Access publishing of ASPP-funded books. The poilcy, adopted as of April 1, 2015, is based on the following principles:

  • The Federation supports Open Access; and
  • A dynamic Canadian scholarly publishing sector continues to be of utmost importance to the dissemination of Canadian research.

The policy states that the Federation will actively promote and facilitate Open Access publishing of ASPP-funded books.


Canada Prizes

The Canada Prizes are awarded annually to the best scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences that have received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP). The winning books make an exceptional contribution to scholarship, are engagingly written, and enrich the social, cultural and intellectual life of Canada.

2018 Canada Prizes

Latest news
Jury members
Call for Nominations


Latest news

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the jury members for the 2018 Canada Prizes.

The finalists will be announced in early March and the winners will be announced in early April. The winners will be celebrated at an awards ceremony to be held at the Congress 2018 of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 

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2017 Canada Prizes jury

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the jury members for the 2018 Canada Prizes.

Jury members for the Canada Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Chair: Patricia Demers researches and teaches in the areas of early modern women's writing; Elizabethan and Jacobean drama; 17th-century poetry;18th-century novels; biblical literature; children's literature; and contemporary women's writing. She was awarded the University Cup in 2005 and the CAUT Sarah Shorten Award in 2008. She has served as Department Chair (1995-98) and Vice-President of SSHRC (1998-2002); she is the Past President of The Royal Society of Canada (2005-07). She was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012 and was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2016.

Recent publications include The Beginning of Print Culture in Athabasca Country: A Facsimile Edition and Translation of a Prayer Book in Cree Syllabics (ed. and co-trans, 2010), Travels and Tales of Miriam Green Ellis: Pioneer Journalist of the Canadian West (ed., 2013), and an annotated edition of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon's Translation of Bishop John Jewel's Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae (2016). She chaired the Royal Society expert panel and its subsequent report, The Future Now: Canada's Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory (2014).

Eric Helleiner is Professor in the Department of Political Science and Balsillie School of International Affairs at the University of Waterloo. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and has received the Trudeau Foundation Fellows Prize, the Donner Book Prize, the Symons Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Canadian Political Science Association Prize in International Relations, and the Francesco Guicciardini Prize for Best Book in Historical International Relations. In addition to publishing over 100 journal articles and chapters, he has authored and edited eleven books, of which the most recent is Governing the World’s Biggest Market: The Politics of Derivatives Markets After the 2008 Crisis (Oxford University Press, 2018), co-edited with Stefano Pagliari and Irene Spagna. He is also presently co-editor with Jonathan Kirshner of the book series Cornell Studies in Money.

Arthur J. Ray, Professor Emeritus, UBC, is an historical geographer who writes extensively about native people, aboriginal claims, and the Canadian fur trade. His recent publications include: Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History (2016), Telling It To the Judge (2011), An Illustrated History of Canada’s Native People (4th edition 2016). He is editor of Life and Death by the Frozen Sea: The York Fort Journals of Hudson’s Bay Captain James Knight, 1714-17 (forthcoming 2018) with the Champlain Society.

For over twenty-five years he also served as an expert witness in First Nations land and treaty rights cases and Métis rights litigation, including the landmark cases of Horseman v. the Regina (1990), (treaty rights), Delgamuukw v. British Columbia, (1997) (aboriginal title), and Regina v. Powley (2003) (Métis rights).

 

Nancy Turner is an ethnobotanist and ethnoecologist whose research focuses on traditional knowledge systems and traditional land and resource management systems of Indigenous Peoples of western Canada. She is a 2015 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Fellow and Professor Emerita with the School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, BC. She has worked with First Nations elders and cultural specialists in northwestern North America for over 45 years, helping to document, retain and promote their traditional knowledge of plants and environments, including Indigenous foods, materials and traditional medicines. Her two-volume book, Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America (2014, McGill-Queen’s University Press), represents an integration of her long term research.

Jury members for the Prix du Canada en sciences humaines et sociales 

The jury members for the Prix du Canada en sciences humaines et sociales will be announced soon.  

 

 

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Call for Nominations

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences is no longer accepting nominations for the 2018 Canada Prizes in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The nomination period generally takes place from the September to October each year.  

Eligibility and Submission Process

Books eligible for the 2018 prizes received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP) between August 1, 2016 and July 31, 2017. A list of eligible books is available here. Translations and critical editions are not eligible.

The publishers of these books have been contacted via email and asked to nominate books of their choice. They may nominate a specified number of books from their list of eligible titles.

All nominated titles will be forwarded to the jury, who will select the finalists and the winner.

Questions? Email aspp-paes@ideas-idees.ca

 

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About the Canada Prizes

Archives: Canada Prizes