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Feb 5

Big Thinking

Judicial activism and the role of courts in providing remedies

Kent Roach, Trudeau Fellow, Professor of Law, and Prichard-Wilson Chair of Law and Public Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law
February 5, 2015

Courts around the world are searching for new, pro-active ways to provide redress for violations of citizens’ human rights. Recent controversial Canadian court decisions on health care, drug laws, prostitution and assisted suicide suggest that judicial activism is alive and well in Canada. 
 
Kent Roach, Trudeau Fellow, Professor of Law, and Prichard-Wilson Chair of Law and Public Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, situates Canada’s courts in an international context. He discusses past and future judicial interventions in health care, police misconduct and prison conditions in Canada and abroad. In the process, he examines the strengths and weaknesses of courts and what their decisions tell us about the separation of powers in modern democracies. 
 
This Big Thinking lecture was organized by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences in partnership with the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation.
 
This lecture is part of the 20th anniversary of the Big Thinking lecture series on Parliament Hill. For the anniversary, the series has invited lecturers to share their perspectives on how policy issues have – or have not – changed, and what we can learn going forward.
 

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