Blog

Welcome to the blog for the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Posts on this site are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Federation, its staff or its board of directors. Entries are posted in the language of the author.

Members of the university research community are invited to make guest blog submissions on issues relating to the wellbeing of the humanities and social sciences research and learning enterprise in Canada. Click here to read the Federations’ blog policy. Please send your submission to communications@ideas-idees.ca.

Quebec and English-Canadian Feminists 40 Years after the Bird Commission

Jill McCalla Vickers, Carleton University
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

I recently read in the Globe and Mail that Quebec’s MNAs had unanimously passed the following resolution, “that [Quebec’s] National Assembly reaffirms the right of...

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Beyond Diversity Smokescreens: On the small screen and behind the scenes

Rita Shelton Deverell, Mount St. Vincent University
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

In my 36 years in Canadian broadcasting, I’ve championed meaningful inclusion of the four designated groups. It goes with my professional territory as a black...

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Rethinking hate crimes: The hard work of creating social equity

Lucas Crawford and Robert Nichols, University of Alberta
Guest Contributors

Monday, May 10th was Alberta’s inaugural ‘Hate Crimes Awareness Day,’ an event that raised more questions than answers.  Offered as an opportunity to ‘celebrate’ the successes of the past few decades, many in those communities supposedly most protected by such legislation—racialized minorities, Indigenous peoples and the LGBTQ [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer] community, for instance— took this as an opportunity to challenge them as a vehicle for promoting safe, just communities.

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Dalhousie Scholar wins Donner Prize

Emily Andrew, editor at University of British Columbia Press, rang today to tell me that one of UBCP’s authors, Brian Bow of Dalhousie University, has won the Donner Prize for his book The Politics of Linkage:  Power, Interdependence, and Ideas in Canada-US Relations.  The Donner is given annually to the most outstanding and innovative book on Canadian public policy—and this year’s winner was proudly supported by the Aid to Scholarly Publications Program.  The ASPP is run by...

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