Blog

Welcome to the blog for the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Posts on this site are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Federation, its staff or its board of directors. Entries are posted in the language of the author.

Members of the university research community are invited to make guest blog submissions on issues relating to the wellbeing of the humanities and social sciences research and learning enterprise in Canada. Click here to read the Federations’ blog policy. Please send your submission to communications@ideas-idees.ca.

Dalhousie Scholar wins Donner Prize

Emily Andrew, editor at University of British Columbia Press, rang today to tell me that one of UBCP’s authors, Brian Bow of Dalhousie University, has won the Donner Prize for his book The Politics of Linkage:  Power, Interdependence, and Ideas in Canada-US Relations.  The Donner is given annually to the most outstanding and innovative book on Canadian public policy—and this year’s winner was proudly supported by the Aid to Scholarly Publications Program.  The ASPP is run by...

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The Humanities: Relationships with others and with the world are essential to freedom

Susan Babbitt, Queen’s University
Guest Contributor

“Humanities” refers to human beings and to the human condition. In the Humanities we raise questions about what it means to be human. But, at least in my discipline of Philosophy, we teach mostly the work of philosophers from North America and Northern Europe, most of them male and white. We look for wisdom in only some human experience. The Humanities, especially Philosophy, should look beyond Europe and North America.

The ethics we teach are mostly based in liberalism. Philosophical liberalism teaches, roughly, that we are free...

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Lawyer, professor, Mi’kmaq woman: Equity matters in my experience

Patricia Doyle-Bedwell, Dalhousie University
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

I am a Mi’kmaq woman who also holds an academic post and, to many, it appears that I have succeeded in the mainstream educational system. I have pondered the issue of equity.  I have tried to wrap my head around the abstract notion of equity within my own...

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Towards Achieving Equity: New changes to CAUT’s governance structure

Penni Stewart, Canadian Association of University Teachers
Guest Contributor

Thank you for the invitation to post the news about the changes to the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) governance structure to the Federations’ Equity Matters Blog.

We understand how these changes would be of interest to academic staff in the humanities and social sciences working towards achieving equity in the communities where they work.

A summary of the structural changes is available on the front page of our website for anyone interested in the details (www.caut.ca). Excerpt from...

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L’embauche de conjoints: une question d’équité?

Christine Daigle, Université de Brock

Article invité Les couples universitaires ne sont plus une rareté. Finie l’époque où monsieur le professeur vaquait à ses recherches et à son enseignement alors que l’épouse supportait tous ses efforts en s’occupant de la maison et de la petite famille. Une de mes collègues m’a raconté comment, récemment engagée dans un département uniquement masculin dans les années 80, on ne savait comment agir avec elle. La chose était si inusitée! On ne l’invitait pas aux événements sociaux du département mais plutôt aux événements sociaux des femmes de professeurs. Les choses ont bien changé (sauf peut-être dans certains bastions où on résiste...

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