Blog

Welcome to the blog for the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Posts on this site are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Federation, its staff or its board of directors. Entries are posted in the language of the author.

Members of the university research community are invited to make guest blog submissions on issues relating to the wellbeing of the humanities and social sciences research and learning enterprise in Canada. Click here to read the Federations’ blog policy. Please send your submission to communications@ideas-idees.ca.

Leading on equity and diversity matters: Yes we can, and yes we will!

Malinda S. Smith, Vice-President, Equity Issues

Canada’s rapidly changing demographic reality is shaped by globalization, migration and diversity. Our population growth is driven by racialised (visible) minorities and Aboriginal people. Currently constituting 4.1 percent of the overall population, census data show Aboriginal people, particularly Inuit and First Nations, are growing at twice the rate of the general population. When Canada marks the 150th anniversary of Confederation...

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A call for dialogue: Race, representation and media

Patrick Case, Director, Human Rights and Equity Office, University of Guelph
Guest Contributor

A recent magazine article on Asian students has stirred a heated debate about balancing freedom of expression with protecting Canadians from discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity or national origin. The article sparked a debate about possible limits to speech in a country which prides itself on its ability to integrate peoples and beliefs from every corner of the world. That this debate is taking place should be no surprise; balancing freedom of expression with media representations of race, ethnicity and religion is at the forefront of everyday...

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Teaching Equity Matters – Race, space and the law, Part II

Angela P. Harris, Berkeley Law School
Guest Contributor

In Part I of this reflection on teaching race matters I examined a successful story of co-teaching race and the law in Brazil with Denise da Silva. In Part II I draw on an unsuccessful story teaching race and the law in order to think through how we talk about teaching about race. I discuss three types of issues that tend to emerge – intellectual, interpersonal, and institutional issues. While the specific example I draw on...

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Between militarization and litigiousness: Canada's policy choices in the fight against cybercrime

According to a February 2010 survey sponsored by the antivirus software company Symantec, 79% of respondents in 14 countries believed that cybercriminals will never be brought to justice.

As the risks linked to the use of Internet and its pervasiveness in our everyday lives become better documented, Canadian policies relating to cybercrime remain relatively vague.  Some countries, like the United States, have chosen to militarize their response to these threats while others, such as France, have based their response on excessive litigiousness.

What are the choices available to Canadian policy- and decision-makers?  Is it possible to consider an alternative approach to bridging the characteristics of the Internet and a flexible legislative framework that can respond to the needs of Canadians facing increasing cyber-...

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Teaching Equity Matters – Race, space and the law, Part I

Angela P. Harris, Berkeley Law School
Guest Contributor

These reflections are based on a workshop I conducted on “teaching race and the law” at the University of Alberta this past October.  I hope these reflections will be useful to those teachers who are thinking through course goals, learning objectives, and expectations in different geographical and cultural spaces. Teaching happens in a lot of places and a lot of ways. I have been a classroom law teacher for...

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