April 2018

Archives

Top tourist destinations in Regina

Guest blog by the University of Regina communications team

Located smackdab in the middle of the prairies, Regina is Saskatchewan’s capital city and home to countless exciting attractions. Whether you’re a fan of beautiful parks, lively sporting events, arts and culture, great shopping, or unique culinary experiences – Regina truly offers something for everyone.

Wascana Centre is a stunning 930-hectare park located in the heart of Regina (and it’s where the University of Regina main campus is located!). Take a picturesque stroll or run around Wascana Lake and enjoy being close to nature. Wascana, the largest urban park in Canada, is also home to many other tourist attractions, including the Legislative Building,...

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Gabriel Miller addresses March for Science 2018

Speech made at the March for Science in Toronto on April 14, 2018

[Check against delivery]

Thank you. It’s wonderful to be here with you marching for knowledge, for evidence, and for science!

And I want to thank the organizers. Thank you for all the hard work that you put into today. And thank you for inviting me, someone who represents the humanities and social sciences to be part of today’s festivities.

You understand that there’s lots of space for everyone in this parade – everyone, that is, who cares about learning. Who cares about facts. Who cares about truth.

The tools and methods we use will differ depending on the subject, but beneath those differences is something much bigger and more important that unites us – a drive to better understand ourselves and the world we...

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How debate about taxation reveals social inequality

When it comes to taxes, there is a widespread popular belief that we all agree on one thing: others don’t pay their fair share of income tax.

The feeling was much the same among early Canadians, as we learn from reading Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917. The book, by Elsbeth A. Heaman, a professor of history at McGill University, won a 2018 Canada Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Power struggles between the inhabitants of Upper and Lower Canada regarding taxes and the impact of taxation on the lives of their poorest citizens form the basic fabric of the book, published by McGill-Queen’s University Press. Note that this...

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Crimes that tell us much about our society

What do “La Corriveau,” “Dr. l’Indienne” and the “brigands of Cap-Rouge” have in common? All were celebrated criminals who captured the popular imagination in 19th- and 20th-century Quebec.

La communauté du dehors. Imaginaire social et crimes célèbres au Québec (XIXe – XXe siècle) (the outlier community – collective imagination and famous crimes in 19th- and 20th-century Quebec) by Alex Gagnon, a postdoctoral fellow at Université du Québec à Montréal, published by Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal, relates how these crimes achieved notoriety and explains the role played by the popular imagination in Quebec society. 

Having already garnered four awards since its...

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SSHRC celebrates 40 years of ideas, talent and diversity

Guest blog by The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

Congress 2018 coincides with the 40th anniversary of the founding of SSHRC, and we are excited to contribute some excellent events to its program. 

Our Storytellers contest will once again bring the next generation of talented students to the event to showcase how social sciences and humanities research is affecting our lives, our world and our future for the better. Come watch their presentations in the CK-Centre for Kinesiology — also known as the Congress Hub — in the Expo Event Space.

Don’t forget to join us at a reception in the same location after this event to celebrate SSHRC’s 40th birthday — cake will be served! Find out more about...

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Jennifer Welsh addresses the crisis of liberal democracy in ‘The Decline of the West’

Guest blog by André Magnan, Congress 2018 Convenor, University of Regina

This is a Congress 2018 blog about event #1235. Click here to find out more about it.

In recent weeks, the governments of the U.K., Canada, the U.S. and other Western countries have expelled dozens of Russian diplomats from their capital cities. This diplomatic rebuke has come in response to the poisoning of a former Russian double agent on British soil, a crime the U.K. blames on the Russian state. Add to this the on-going fallout from Russian interference into the 2016 American election, and it seems that relations between Russia and the West have hit their lowest point since the end of the Cold War.

Do these events suggest the dawn of the Cold War 2.0, or an even more complex and multi-sided era of geopolitical rivalry? What are the prospects for liberal democracy in such a world? What can be done...

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Decolonizing and strengthening Indigenous research: International perspectives

Guest blog by Dina Guth, PhD, Program Officer, Research Grants & Partnerships Division, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

This is a Congress 2018 blog about event #1212. Click here to find out more about it.

How does the research community act on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) call to strengthen Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods at post-secondary institutions? The social sciences and humanities must lead the way in engaging and learning from different perspectives to respond to this question.  

For Congress 2018, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) has gathered a panel of leading international scholars to explore strengthening Indigenous research and research training through a global lens. Come hear how...

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Eat Local, Taste Global: How Ethnocultural Food Reaches our Tables

Guest blog by Glen C. Filson, Professor Emeritus, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph and Bamidele Adekunle, Adjunct Professor, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph

When questions emerged about a decade ago regarding whether — and to what extent —Toronto’s immigrant communities could access their preferred vegetables, our multiethnic team sought empirical answers. We interviewed 250 vegetable buyers each from the Greater Toronto Area’s largest ethnic groups — South Asian, Chinese and Afro-Caribbean Canadians — to determine their 10 preferred vegetables, such as okra, callaloo, bok choy, and bitter melon. They also told us...

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Indigenous knowledge at the heart of Cultural Connections programming

Communications team, University of Regina

We’ve all experienced it. Call it “session fatigue” – that moment you realize that, as compelling as the topic may be, your mind and body need a break from paper presentations. Thankfully, Congress includes plenty of innovative cultural programming that will provide such a break. The Cultural Connections series will give attendees an opportunity to learn, reflect, network, and be entertained through events that creatively bridge the social sciences, humanities, and the arts and build on the Congress theme, “Gathering diversities.”

These events will showcase the University’s strengths in the areas of art and technology, music, theatre, film, and visual arts, and build connections with Regina’s arts...

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