July 2015

Archives

Lunch-Bucket Lives: Remaking the Workers' City

Craig Heron, York University

Hamilton is an iconic city in Canada. For generations, it has been the quintessential factory town, a status confirmed by the view of fire-spewing, smoke-belching Dark Satanic Mills from the Burlington Skyway on the road to Niagara Falls. I was not raised there, and can’t remember any childhood visits. But, in the late 1970s, it was at the forefront of my mind as I started thinking about a PhD dissertation topic. I was interested in the wave of profound changes that hit industrial cities across the continent in the early years of the twentieth-century: large-scale corporate consolidation; new management and technological systems that ushered in mass...

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Des nouvelles méthodes d’apprentissage pour « Imaginer l’avenir du Canada »

Jo-Anni Joncas, doctorante en Administration et évaluation en éducation à l’Université Laval et reporteure pour l’initiative Imaginer l’avenir du Canada organisé par le CRSH et l’ACES

Pour continuer à prospérer au XXIe siècle, le Canada doit être proactif et réfléchir collectivement à ses possibilités d’avenir afin d’être en mesure d’anticiper ses besoins comme société et en matière de connaissances, ainsi que les enjeux auxquels il pourrait devoir faire face. C’est pourquoi l’initiative « Imaginer l’avenir du Canada » a été organisée par l’Association canadienne pour les études supérieures (ACES) et le Conseil de recherche en sciences humaines (CRSH) du Canada. Six questions ont été identifiées pour mettre en lumière les défis que le Canada devra relever dans un contexte mondialisé en...

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SSH News: July 9, 2015

Here is our list of the most interesting news articles on the humanities, social sciences and higher education from the past week. Voici notre liste des plus intéressants articles concernant les sciences humaines, sciences sociales et l’enseignement supérieur de la semaine passée.

Humanities and Social Sciences | Sciences humaines et socials

The government should support the independent study of Canada
July 7, 2015 | Embassy

Robots Might Save the Humanities
July 6, 2015 | New Republic

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The Utility of History: Perspectives on International Development

Victoria Hawkins, student blogger at Congress 2015

Don’t say history doesn’t have the power to change the future. At Congress 2015, Historians of Humanitarian Aid held a panel on the "utility of history" in today’s development in the Global South. Jill Campbell-Miller of St. Mary’s University (pictured) presented a case study of Canadian bi-lateral assistance to India in the 1950 to illustrate how the history of development practice is important and useful for both scholars and practitioners of international development today.

Campbell-Miller argued that at the very least, history can have an effect on institutional memory, the collective understanding of an institution’s past. That understanding could potentially contribute to...

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Roundtable: Working in Public History

Victoria Hawkins, student blogger at Congress 2015

The work of public historians can take many different forms, some quite unexpected. A roundtable discussion at Congress 2015 focused on the different roles that public historians take in their work. Jennifer Anderson of Library and Archives Canada acted as moderator of the discussion. Anderson is currently working on assignment at the Canadian Museum of History and offered insight into the role of both archives and museums in shaping public memory.

As a relatively new field, Public History has many unexpected applications in both the public and private sectors.The panel of speakers represented the various roles of public historians, from freelance and contract work for museums and other cultural...

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Who is telling our stories? Canadian millennials in literature and the humanities

 

Kofi Hope, Rhodes Scholar, Doctor of Philosophy in Politics & Managing Director, Community Empowering Enterprises

On July 14, Go Set a Watchman will be released to the general public, a sequel of sorts to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.  Few works of literature have had a more profound role in shaping conversations on race in the 20th century than To Kill a Mockingbird

For my part, I read the book in 1999 as a grade 10 student in Mississauga.  While...

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