October 2012

Archives

La construction de martyrs au Moyen-Orient: Bourses postdoctorales Banting 2012

Daniel Drolet Journaliste indépendant

Laure Guirguis, née d’une mère française et d’un père égyptien chrétien, parle l’arabe et a régulièrement séjourné en Égypte depuis son enfance.

Titulaire d’un DEA (Master 2) en philosophie, elle n’avait pas songé à concentrer ses efforts sur le problème copte lorsqu’elle a commencé son doctorat sur les transformations de la scène politique égyptienne. Son directeur de recherche lui a signalé l’actualité de ce sujet pour sa thèse de doctorat en études politiques à l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales à Paris.

Elle a vécu en Égypte de 2005 à 2010,  et a donc pu observer de près la fin du régime de Hosni Moubarak. Aujourd’hui elle est installée à Montréal. Récipiendaire d’une Bourse Banting du gouvernement canadien pour des études...

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Re:education: Mapping Canada's 21st Century University System

On October 6, The Globe and Mail introduced Re:education in their Our Time to Lead series, which looked at everything from digital learning to debt loads. One of the highlights in our minds was the article by James Bradshaw, published on October 13, which examined the value of a broad education in today’s society. It picked up on something we also find noteworthy: rapidly expanding economies and education systems, ones that have previously focussed tremendous attention on science and technology, are turning to Canada for advice on liberal arts curriculum citing poor overall career performance and lack of leadership opportunities for even their best engineering or science graduates.

What was unfortunate was one of the final notes of the series. In her...

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Ideas can...transform

Alison Hebbs, Director of Policy and Communications
Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

A new idea excites its creator(s), leads to debate, and sparks discovery that drives people forward. Ideas give us hope, earn respect for those who went before us, and help us build a better place for those who will come. People with ideas enhance their communities, share knowledge with others and build connections for the future. Ideas are about being human and caring about the world.

And, ideas have changed us. You may not even know us (the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences), but you know the people we represent: 85,000 students, scholars and researchers in the humanities, arts and social sciences. They study everything from...

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Congress 2013 @ the edge

Milena Stanoeva
Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

at the edge - a la fine pointeWhat does it mean to be “@ the edge”? With the 2013 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences taking place in coastal Victoria, BC, the theme seems to suggest itself.

However, “@ the edge” is also a call to expand discussion and welcome marginalized voices, including those of people who are socially marginalized through economics or health factors, people who are physically distant from centres of power and influence, and indigenous peoples whose languages and cultures are endangered. It is a call for the social sciences and humanities to focus on issues of inclusivity, marginalization and diversity and offer innovative solutions. It is a call to test the boundaries of disciplines and take a leap into uncharted...

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News from the social sciences and humanities: Canada Research Chairs, academic stars and the decline of the liberal arts

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Last week, the federal government announced a new round of funding for the Canada Research Chairs program. The government is investing $121.6M in the program. CFHSS’s official statement on the announcement is here.

We are launching a new blog series called Research Stars, where we will profile researchers in the social sciences and humanities. Heather Walmsley, one of this year’s Banting Postdoctoral Fellows, was the first researcher to be profiled for her work on the transnational human egg...

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Canada and the transnational human egg trade: 2012 Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship highlights

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Heather WalmsleyWith innovations like babies with three genetic parents, what is reality in the field of reproductive technology today seems like it would have been science fiction mere decades ago. And while reproductive technology has helped thousands of couples with reproductive issues, same sex couples and single parents start families, policy and research around the field is lagging. One area of concern that remains largely unaddressed is the international human egg trade and its implications for women on both sides of the transaction.

This issue will be the subject of Heather Walmsley’s research, entitled “Canada and the transnational human egg trade:  implications for women's agency and...

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News from the social sciences and humanities: Trudeau Fellows, GG Literary Awards and environmental humanities

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

This week, the Trudeau Foundation announced its 2012 Fellows – Maria Campbell, Catherine Dauvergne, Joseph Heath and Janine Marchessault. CFHSS congratulates this year’s fellows!

Finalists have been announced for the Governor General’s Literary Awards. Yannick Roy, an ASPP-funded author, is among the French finalists for non-fiction for his book La révélation inachevée : le personnage à l’épreuve de la vérité Romanesque, published by Presses de l’Université de...

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CFHSS congratulates Yannick Roy, Governor General Literary Awards finalist

The Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences is pleased to congratulate Yannick Roy for qualifying as a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Awards for his ASPP-supported  book, La révélation inachevée : le personnage à l’épreuve de la vérité Romanesque, published by Presses de l’Université de Montréal.

About the book: “Long considered frivolous, the novel, at least since Don Quixote, has curiously turned against itself in the name of the reality it was originally criticized for avoiding. It has nonetheless remained, discreetly, true to its origins, i.e. to lies and illusions. Through the work of Cervantès, Balzac, Flaubert,...

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