April 2010

Archives

Indigenous knowledge, anti-colonialism and empowerment

Waziyatawin, University of Victoria
Guest Contributor

Indigenous knowledge recovery is an anti-colonial project.  It is a project that gains its momentum from the anguish of loss of what was and the determined hope for what will be.  It springs from the disaster resulting from the centuries of colonialism’s efforts to methodically eradicate our ways of seeing, being and interacting with the world.  At the dawn of the 21st century, the...

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'The work is far from done': Women, feminism, intersectionality

Wendy Robbins, University of New Brunswick
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

“Women’s committees, it was argued, cannot effectively address intersectionality.” This was one of the main reasons given for dismantling the ...

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Encourager l’engagement citoyen du chercheur : un rôle fondamental pour la Fédération

Dans son discours aux participants à l’assemblée générale réunie à Ottawa à la fin du mois de mars, la présidente de la Fédération, Noreen Golfman, a réfléchi sur le travail du chercheur dans une perspective citoyenne.   Selon Mme Golfman, la Fédération est un milieu de réflexion où les membres s’intéressent davantage à leur action citoyenne qu’à leur carrière, davantage à ce qu’ils peuvent partager qu’à ce qu’ils méritent. Plus précisément, elle a examiné le rôle de la Fédération en vue de favoriser un sens du devoir collectif — c’est-à-dire aller au-delà de ce que Donald Hall, dans son œuvre The Academic Community: A Manual for Change, appelle le moi universitaire et penser plus généreusement à faire partie d’une collectivité universitaire.

Dans un monde qui favorise trop souvent l’innovation technologique et les extrants, Mme Golfman a également rappelé l’importance pour les sciences sociales et humaines d’éviter d’être perçues comme marginales...

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Royal Commission on the Status of Women @ 40: Women's diversity and community leadership

Caroline Andrew, University of Ottawa
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

Forty years on, it is interesting to look back on the Royal Commission on the Status of Women (RCSW) that was led by Florence Bird.  In part there is...

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Addressing racism: Toward equity and diversity in higher education

Grace-Edward Galabuzi, Ryerson University
Guest Contributor

Last month, a study conducted by Statistics Canada for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canadian Heritage and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada entitled Projections of the Diversity of the Canadian Population, 2006 -2031, provided a look into the future of Canadian society: One in every three people will be from a racialized group, up to about 14.4 million people....

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“Mentoring is Key!” Success for female graduate students

Marlene Pomrenke, University of Manitoba
Guest Contributor

The following narratives describe the ways in which female graduate students see mentoring as essential to their academic success. As one woman stated, “Having a responsive and engaged advisor has been critical to completing my degree.” Another woman stated, “My mentors know my strengths and more importantly, my weaknesses. Thus they are able to provide useful feedback on how I can improve.” And finally as one other woman succinctly stated, “Mentoring is key! It is the business of who you know and how connected you are.”

These narratives and...

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Much ado about mentoring

Over the past few weeks, some of our Equity Matters content has featured posts exploring the issues behind mentoring in the academy, including a podcast from Minister Faust and pieces about mentoring within one's discipline and  an unconventional mentoring relationship. Along with a post setting out the discussion, these posts culminated in 'Much Ado about Mentoring,' a plenary session at the Federation's annual meeting of the General Assembly. This plenary featured a range of academics who spoke to their own encounters with mentoring, as well as the underlying philosophies.

The...

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Engaged Scholarship

Engaged scholarship, Knowledge mobilization, Social innovation - all of these terms have been gained prominence in the past few years as ways to describe how researchers and scholars can connect with communities. Regardless of your preferred term, it is clear that strong relationships between researchers and communities have been developing, leading to many creative and constructive results.

On March 28, 2010, the Annual Meeting of the Federation's General Assembly featured an intriguing and thoughtful session on Engaged Scholarship, moderated by Karen Grant, VP Research Policy. Listen to the full podcast of the session below, or read the live blog account of the event here. Excuse the initial part of the recording - the session gets underway at 2:34 into the recording.

[podcast]...

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Anti-Racism: Is there a university responsibility?

Carol Tator, York University
Guest Contributor

“Who are we in the university…? What do we represent? Whom do we represent? Are we responsible? For what and to whom? If there is a university responsibility, it at least begins with the moment when a need to hear these questions, to take them upon oneself and respond, is imposed. This imperative of the response is the initial form and minimal requirement of responsibility,”...

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Equity, human rights and inclusive knowledge

Vanaja Dhruvarajan, Carleton University
Guest Contributor

Universities are one of the most important sites of knowledge production. Open and inclusive dialogue contributes generously to the knowledge commons. It allows all of us to take advantage of new insights and perspectives. The need for such a site for knowledge production is more important today than ever as the processes of globalization accelerate, the world shrinks and people of varied backgrounds comingle with each other. Becoming aware of multiple...

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Social impact of diversity: Potentials and challenges in Canada

Jeffrey G. Reitz, University of Toronto
Guest Contributor

Multiculturalism has been a cornerstone of Canadian policy for almost 40 years, but internationally, particularly since 9/11 and in light of inter-ethnic conflicts in Europe resulting from immigration, there has been something of a ‘retreat’ from multiculturalism. Should Canada keep multiculturalism despite problems elsewhere?  Or should our multiculturalism policies be changed, or perhaps even abandoned?

Debate over multiculturalism is partly a question of...

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