SSH news

SSH News: Innovation, Humanities in the Digital Age, Big Data

Last Saturday was International Women’s Day, so it’s only fitting to share that ideas can be… smart and beautiful! “For years now, the call for more real-looking models to be used in clothing ads has been echoed by women around the globe. A San Francisco-based fashion retailer appears to be heeding that cry this season -- at least in part -- by using PhDs and doctoral candidates instead of fashion models to show off its goods” (CBC News).

While equity and diversity are being embraced in the digital age in this way, ubiquitous advanced technologies are also impacting the pace of innovation and the social sciences and humanities. This week, Bill...

Read more »

SSH News: Congress 2017, Canadian Innovation, Imagining Canada’s Future, Big Thinking

Ryerson University has been selected to host the 2017 edition of Canada's largest academic gathering, the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, which organizes Congress every year, and the university made the announcement on March 6 at a Ryerson event called Humanities: Past present and future., At Ryerson, Provost and Vice President Mohamed Lachemi, President Sheldon Levy, and Faculty of Arts Dean Jean-Paul Boudreau all expressed their excitement at the announcement.

Congress...

Read more »

Concordia Looks Back 53 Years with University TV

Christine Mitchell, Department of English, Concordia University

The Concordia University community will take a peek into its past later this week when its Media History Research Centre holds a screening of two half-hour television episodes produced on the university campus in 1961.

The programs were part of a seven-episode series that was shot live in temporary campus studios and aired on Sunday mornings at 10:00. The episodes featured faculty, students and administrative personnel in mock classroom situations and in dialogue with host Syd Davidson and focused on university life. The program’s topic is summed up in its simple title: University. Campus newspaper The Georgian described the program as “the first English-language experiment in televised education at the university level.”

Today’s audience may be surprised to discover its forebears concentrating on and grappling over many of the same concerns that abound on Canadian university...

Read more »

SSH News: Canada’s adult literacy, Freedom to Read Week, Big Thinking

Quoting Ralph Waldo Emerson, American essayist, lecturer and poet, “I cannot remember the books I’ve read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.” Unfortunately, this paradigm is not universal. Concerns about Canadian literacy have been heightened this week with reports that there is a high number of adults in Canada who lack basic literacy skills. In fact, according to Daniel Munro of the Centre for Skills and PSE “research by the Centre for Skills and Post-Secondary Education has revealed some troubling gaps between Canadians’ educational attainment and the skills we actually develop...

Read more »

SSH News: Big Thinking, Canada’s Innovation Challenge, AAAS 2014

This month’s Big Thinking lecture presented by Joseph Heath, Director, Centre for Ethics, and Professor, Department of Philosophy and School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto, is now available to view online. This lecture addressed "reason versus passion" in politics and what we are sacrificing when we allow our political system to be dominated by appeals to passion rather than reason. The event was also captured in an article in The Hill Times this week: U of T prof calls for Enlightenment 2.0 to combat environment of ‘truthiness’ (available by...

Read more »

Forward thinking: Interdisciplinary programs and the adjacent possible

Michael Ullyot, Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning), Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary

When I was an undergraduate, the recruiting poster for an interdisciplinary program in the humanities asked, "What do Leonardo da Vinci and Martha Stewart have in common?" The answer: "They're both generalists."

Whatever you think of its chosen exemplars, that program is no more. All interdisciplinary programs ebb and flow with intellectual currents, as they should -- but their common aim is to imagine future fields of study, emerging from the fields between the disciplinary borders of our imagined present. So computational linguistics, for instance, arose from exchanges between linguists and computer scientists. Often...

Read more »

SSH News: Big Thinking, Federal Budget 2014, SSHRC Impact Awards

The most recent Big Thinking lecture "Reason versus passion in politics" was presented on Tuesday by Joseph Heath, Director, Centre for Ethics, and Professor, Department of Philosophy and School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto. This lecture addressed "reason versus passion" in politics and what we are sacrificing when we allow our political system to be dominated by appeals to passion rather than reason. Léo Charbonneau, editor at University Affairs, reflected on Heath's talk in his article “Emotion should not rule over reason in politics” (University Affairs).

And just maybe, reason in politics did prevail this week… To...

Read more »

SSH News: Value of an SSH education, Situating Science Summer School 2014, Trudeau Foundation

Yes! The indispensability of the social sciences and humanities has been a trending topic in recent days, both nationally and internationally. Last week, Carolyn Gregoire penned the “irrefutable evidence of the value of a humanities education” (The Huffington Post), while Patrick Dunleavy, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at London School of Economics, shared his opinions on how the “skew towards science is neglecting a...

Read more »

SSH News: ASPP, Outaouais Salon du Livre, Canada Reads 2014, Annual Engagement Scholarship Consortium Conference

This week, the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences was pleased and honoured to welcome Annalise Acorn as an expert in Law for the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP). Annalise Acorn is a professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Alberta. With research interests that include the theory of the emotions in the context of conflict and justice, she has also authored a book entitled Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice on the rhetoric of the restorative movement. Funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the ASPP is a unique program that helps...

Read more »

SSH News: We Teach Ontario, Creating the Future U, Impact of the Social Sciences, Open Data for Development Challenge, Canada Council for the Arts APM, Canada-Africa Research Exchange Grants

We Teach Ontario, an initiative of the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations, highlights “the ways in which Ontario’s professors and academic librarians are connecting teaching and research to produce exceptional student learning, community engagement, and cutting-edge knowledge.” Most recently, Lisa Philips, Professor and Associate Vice-President of Research at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University) and Director of Research Policy at the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, has been featured in a We Teach...

Read more »

Pages