Federation News

On the Twentieth Anniversary of National Aboriginal Day

Yasmeen Abu-LabanProfessor of Political Science at the University of Alberta, and President of the Canadian Political Science Association

June 21, 2016 marks the twentieth anniversary of National Aboriginal Day.   Canada’s official proclamation of a National Aboriginal Day stemmed from recommendations by Indigenous groups as well as the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.

For those concerned with equity in educational institutions and practices, National Aboriginal Day also offers educators (along with all Canadians) opportunities for sharing in Indigenous cultures and traditions, as well as teaching and learning.

 For example, when I served as a “non-Aboriginal” parent volunteer for the National Aboriginal Day...

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Le congrès de 2016 de la Fédération des sciences humaines du Canada : à propos de l’idée de l’université en tant que communauté

Guy Laforest, Président élu de la Fédération des Sciences Humaines, Professeur, Département de science politique, Université Laval

Ce blog a été publié sur le site web de Guy Laforest le 25 mai, 2016

L’Université de Calgary, située dans les contreforts des Rocheuses canadiennes, accueillera du 28 mai au 3 juin 2016 le congrès de la Fédération des sciences humaines du Canada. Plus de 8,000 participantes et participants, représentant quelque 70 associations savantes dans la grande famille des humanités et des sciences sociales, tiendront dans la métropole économique de l’Alberta leur grande rencontre scientifique annuelle, tout en se retrouvant autour d’un thème fédérateur : l’énergie des communautés. Dans un pays aussi...

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The 2016 Calgary Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada: Some thoughts on the university as a community

Guy Laforest, President-Elect of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor, Departement of Political Science, Université Laval

This blog was published on Guy Laforest's website on May 25th, 2016

The University of Calgary, placed at the foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, will be the host, from May 28 to June 3, 2016, of the congress of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. More than 8,000 participants, representing over 70 scholarly associations in the great family of the humanities and the social sciences will hold their annual meeting in the economic metropolis of Alberta, united around a federating topic: energizing communities. In a country as immense as Canada,...

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Réflexions sur la fondation du Canada

Guy Laforest, Professeur, Département de science politique, Université Laval

Ce blog a été publié sur le site web de Guy Laforest's le 15 mai, 2016

« La conférence de Québec de 1864 150 ans plus tard : comprendre l’émergence de la fédération canadienne ». Tel est le titre d’un ouvrage collectif, préparé par Eugénie Brouillet, Alain-G. Gagnon et moi-même, qui vient d’être publié par les Presses de l’Université Laval (https://www.pulaval.com/produit/la-conference-de-quebec-de-1864-150-ans-plus-tard-comprendre-l-emergence-de-la-federation-canadienne). Ce livre s’inscrit dans...

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Some reflections on the founding of Canada

Guy Laforest, Professor, Departement of Political Science, Université Laval

This blog was published on Guy Laforest's website on May 15th, 2016

« The 1864 Conference of Québec 150 years later : understanding the emergence of the Canadian federation ». Such is the title of a collection of essays, edited by Eugénie Brouillet, Alain-G. Gagnon and myself, that just got published in French by Presses de l’Université Laval (https://www.pulaval.com/produit/la-conference-de-quebec-de-1864-150-ans-plus-tard-comprendre-l-emergence-de-la-federation-canadienne). This book is part of a...

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Remembering Stephen Clarkson: Public intellectual, teacher and scholar

Mel Watkins, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics, University of Toronto

Stephen Clarkson was my colleague and friend for more than 50 years. Gracious and congenial, he was an intensely private person.

He was a legendary teacher who could give a polished lecture without notes. I taught a course with him for many years and he set the bar high. He was much respected by students, who gave him high evaluations.

He was a prolific researcher and writer who received many awards. Fittingly, indefatigable at 78, still not retired and with serious health problems, he was in Portugal on a research tour with students when he fell fatally ill. He died on the go, students in his wake, with pen in hand.

He was proficient in English, French, Spanish, German, Russian...

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Remembering Stephen Clarkson: Public intellectual, teacher and scholar

Mel Watkins, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics, University of Toronto

Stephen Clarkson was my colleague and friend for more than 50 years. Gracious and congenial, he was an intensely private person.

He was a legendary teacher who could give a polished lecture without notes. I taught a course with him for many years and he set the bar high. He was much respected by students, who gave him high evaluations.

He was a prolific researcher and writer who received many awards. Fittingly, indefatigable at 78, still not retired and with serious health problems, he was in Portugal on a research tour with students when he fell fatally ill. He died on the go, students in his wake, with pen in hand.

He was proficient in English, French, Spanish, German, Russian...

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Budget 2016 signals important research and innovation discussions coming in 2016

 

Here at the Federation, we’ve been picking apart the 2016 federal budget and also keeping an eye out for what our colleagues are saying. There seems to be a solid consensus growing: March 22 was a good day for Canadian scholarship in its many forms.

The Federation’s overall impressions are articulated in our post-budget media release, and a detailed analysis of the budget is available in our 2016 budget briefing note. The following is a brief overview of a few key topics, including issues that we feel are likely to be highly relevant in the coming year.

The 2015 Liberal election platform had no specific promises relating to research funding, so it was a welcome surprise to see a funding increase of $95 million split between the...

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Budget 2016 signals important research and innovation discussions coming in 2016

 

Here at the Federation, we’ve been picking apart the 2016 federal budget and also keeping an eye out for what our colleagues are saying. There seems to be a solid consensus growing: March 22 was a good day for Canadian scholarship in its many forms.

The Federation’s overall impressions are articulated in our post-budget media release, and a detailed analysis of the budget is available in our 2016 budget briefing note. The following is a brief overview of a few key topics, including issues that we feel are likely to be highly relevant in the coming year.

The 2015 Liberal election platform had no specific promises relating to research funding, so it was a welcome surprise to see a funding increase of $95 million split between the...

Read more »

Canada needs a Chief Research and Knowledge Advisor

 

It has been exciting to see the Canadian government make progress on its knowledge agenda, beginning with the reinstatement of the long-form census. The Federation is thrilled to be participating in another exciting development: the creation of a new senior research advisor in the federal government. The Federation recently submitted its recommendations to Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan for the creation of a Chief Research and Knowledge Advisor.

In their 2015 election campaign, the Liberal party committed to creating a new Chief Science Officer. As a new government, they’ve so far followed through on that promise, with the prime minister mandating Minister Duncan to create the post. The Federation strongly supports this project, and we have submitted a set of recommendations that we feel can help make Canada’s research-advisory system the best in...

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