Equity Matters

Unreasonably focusing on reasonable accommodation in Canada?

Jean-François Gaudreault-DesBiens, Université de Montréal
Guest Contributor

Here we go again.  As I write this entry, a new controversy has erupted following a Quebec government’s decision to allow private Chassidic schools to hold classes on weekends and even during the summer.  The idea underlying this decision is to permit these schools to teach both their religion-heavy curriculum, which they already do, and the compulsory subjects prescribed by the department of education (French,...

Read more »

Why gender still matters in politics

Brenda O'Neill, University of Calgary
Guest Contributor

It’s safe to say that the issue of ‘women in politics’ no longer generates the attention that it once did. The 1984 leaders’ debate between John Turner (Liberal), Brian Mulroney (Progressive Conservative) and Ed Broadbent (New Democratic Party) on such issues as pay equity, affirmative action, abortion and child care seems unlikely to be repeated in the near future. Women’s issues simply do not generate this level of attention. An exception can be the appearance of...

Read more »

Gender, culture and violence: Toward a "paradigm shift?"

Maneesha Deckha, University of Victoria
Guest Contributor

In analyses of gender equality and violence against women, “tradition” and “culture” frequently are invoked to explain the phenomenon in non-western societies. Specifically, violence against women in non-western societies often is blamed on some lack or deficiency in those cultures, whereas in our society the problem of violence tends to be attributed to a disturbed individual. We see this with the case of, for example, the 1989 Montreal Massacre and Marc Lépine’s...

Read more »

Gender gap distribution of Canada Research Chairs and Canada Excellence Research Chairs

Wendy Robbins, University of New Brunswick
Guest Contributor

“Many of us in this room have worked our whole career to make things fairer, and now you are pushing us right back!” My comment was a spontaneous reaction to René Durocher, who was outlining the Government of Canada’s new multimillion-dollar Canada Research Chairs (CRC) Program to a meeting of the Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada (HSSFC) in 2000. The several hundred HSSFC members on the Chateau’s ballroom...

Read more »

The electoral glass ceiling for women: Representation and political equality

Linda Trimble, University of Alberta
Guest Contributor

Seven years ago Jane Arscott and I wrote a book called Still Counting: Women in Politics Across Canada.  We gave stark evidence of the electoral glass ceiling for women. At that point, 85 years after most women won the right to vote and stand for office, women held only 20% of the seats in Canada’s parliament and legislatures. Sure, 20% was better than nothing. It was better...

Read more »

Gender equality and child development: Re-thinking family policy

Paul Kershaw, University of British Columbia
Guest Contributor

Forty years ago the Royal Commission on the Status of Women recommended family policy innovation. It did so because the gender division of caregiving is a primary source of inequality for women. Today, Canadian women still do not have the family policy they deserve. A 2008 UNICEF Report Card ranked Canada last among 25 countries. It shows Canada lacks policy to promote time to care personally; policy to synchronize...

Read more »

« L’égalité-déjà-là » dans une société post féministe?

Louise Langevin, Université Laval, Québec
Article invité Il y a quelques années, la féministe française Christine Delphy avait dénoncé l’idée qu’elle voyait poindre : « L’égalité-déjà-là » pour les femmes. Puisque les femmes étaient présentes dans toutes les sphères de la société, qu’elles étaient égales en droit et que la plupart de leurs revendications avaient été satisfaites, elles étaient maintenant les égales des hommes. Selon cette idée ou cette perception, nous étions maintenant dans une société «...

Read more »

The 3Ds of the Canadian Women's Movement: Delegitimization, Dismantling and Disappearance

Janine Brodie, University of Alberta
Guest Contributor

The struggle for gender equality in Canada is multidimensional and ongoing, despite the increasingly widespread assumption that gender equality has been achieved (SWC 2005) and the assertion that “we are all equal now.”  The Canadian women’s movement (CWM), similar to its counterparts elsewhere, was and continues to be an amalgam of many different streams of political thinking, organization and activism. Although in the 1970s and 1980s the mainstream of the CMW...

Read more »

Pages