Equity Matters

L’embauche de conjoints: une question d’équité?

Christine Daigle, Université de Brock

Article invité Les couples universitaires ne sont plus une rareté. Finie l’époque où monsieur le professeur vaquait à ses recherches et à son enseignement alors que l’épouse supportait tous ses efforts en s’occupant de la maison et de la petite famille. Une de mes collègues m’a raconté comment, récemment engagée dans un département uniquement masculin dans les années 80, on ne savait comment agir avec elle. La chose était si inusitée! On ne l’invitait pas aux événements sociaux du département mais plutôt aux événements sociaux des femmes de professeurs. Les choses ont bien changé (sauf peut-être dans certains bastions où on résiste...

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Indigenous knowledge, anti-colonialism and empowerment

Waziyatawin, University of Victoria
Guest Contributor

Indigenous knowledge recovery is an anti-colonial project.  It is a project that gains its momentum from the anguish of loss of what was and the determined hope for what will be.  It springs from the disaster resulting from the centuries of colonialism’s efforts to methodically eradicate our ways of seeing, being and interacting with the world.  At the dawn of the 21st century, the recovery of Indigenous knowledge is a conscious...

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'The work is far from done': Women, feminism, intersectionality

Wendy Robbins, University of New Brunswick
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

“Women’s committees, it was argued, cannot effectively address intersectionality.” This was one of the main reasons given for dismantling the Canadian Association of University Teachers’ (CAUT)...

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Royal Commission on the Status of Women @ 40: Women's diversity and community leadership

Caroline Andrew, University of Ottawa
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s ‘Equality Then and Now’ series, marking 40 years since the Royal Commission on the Status of Women. Look for more on this topic in upcoming posts and at Congress 2010.

Forty years on, it is interesting to look back on the Royal Commission on the Status of Women (RCSW) that was led by Florence Bird.  In part there is some nostalgic feelings for that time when – to...

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From traditional mentoring to mentoring networks

James Deaville, Carleton University
Guest Contributor

This is an edited version of Dr. Deaville’s recent presentation to the Federation’s General Assembly meeting on March 27, 2010. Listen to the podcast of the panel presentation, or read the liveblog of the event.

My own academic mentoring consisted of a troubling personal relationship under a senior professor, who introduced me to post-secondary academe through paranoid observations and advice...

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Addressing racism: Toward equity and diversity in higher education

Grace-Edward Galabuzi, Ryerson University
Guest Contributor

Last month, a study conducted by Statistics Canada for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canadian Heritage and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada entitled Projections of the Diversity of the Canadian Population, 2006 -2031, provided a look into the future of Canadian society: One in every three people will be from a racialized group, up to about 14.4 million people....

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“Mentoring is Key!” Success for female graduate students

Marlene Pomrenke, University of Manitoba
Guest Contributor

The following narratives describe the ways in which female graduate students see mentoring as essential to their academic success. As one woman stated, “Having a responsive and engaged advisor has been critical to completing my degree.” Another woman stated, “My mentors know my strengths and more importantly, my weaknesses. Thus they are able to provide useful feedback on how I can improve.” And finally as one other woman succinctly stated, “Mentoring is key! It is the business of who you know and how connected you are.”

These narratives and...

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Much ado about mentoring

Over the past few weeks, some of our Equity Matters content has featured posts exploring the issues behind mentoring in the academy, including a podcast from Minister Faust and pieces about mentoring within one's discipline and  an unconventional mentoring relationship. Along with a post setting out the discussion, these posts culminated in 'Much Ado about Mentoring,' a plenary session at the Federation's annual meeting of the General Assembly. This plenary featured a range of academics who spoke to their own encounters with mentoring, as well as the underlying philosophies.

The...

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Anti-Racism: Is there a university responsibility?

Carol Tator, York University
Guest Contributor

“Who are we in the university…? What do we represent? Whom do we represent? Are we responsible? For what and to whom? If there is a university responsibility, it at least begins with the moment when a need to hear these questions, to take them upon oneself and respond, is imposed. This imperative of the response is the initial form and minimal requirement of responsibility,”...

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Equity, human rights and inclusive knowledge

Vanaja Dhruvarajan, Carleton University
Guest Contributor

Universities are one of the most important sites of knowledge production. Open and inclusive dialogue contributes generously to the knowledge commons. It allows all of us to take advantage of new insights and perspectives. The need for such a site for knowledge production is more important today than ever as the processes of globalization accelerate, the world shrinks and people of varied backgrounds comingle with each other. Becoming aware of multiple worldviews and understanding diverse perspectives...

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