Equity Matters

On the Twentieth Anniversary of National Aboriginal Day

Yasmeen Abu-Laban, Professor of Political Science at the University of Alberta, and President of the Canadian Political Science Association

June 21, 2016 marks the twentieth anniversary of National Aboriginal Day.   Canada’s official proclamation of a National Aboriginal Day stemmed from recommendations by Indigenous groups as well as the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.

For those concerned with equity in educational institutions and practices, National Aboriginal Day also offers educators (along with all Canadians) opportunities for sharing in Indigenous cultures and traditions, as well as teaching and learning.

 For example, when I served as a “non-Aboriginal” parent volunteer for the National Aboriginal Day...

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On the Twentieth Anniversary of National Aboriginal Day

Yasmeen Abu-LabanProfessor of Political Science at the University of Alberta, and President of the Canadian Political Science Association

June 21, 2016 marks the twentieth anniversary of National Aboriginal Day.   Canada’s official proclamation of a National Aboriginal Day stemmed from recommendations by Indigenous groups as well as the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.

For those concerned with equity in educational institutions and practices, National Aboriginal Day also offers educators (along with all Canadians) opportunities for sharing in Indigenous cultures and traditions, as well as teaching and learning.

 For example, when I served as a “non-Aboriginal” parent volunteer for the National Aboriginal Day...

Read more »

Du savoir à l’action : Améliorer la vie des femmes

 

Sue Szabo, Directrice, Politique sociale et économique, Centre de recherches pour le développement international

La recherche est cruciale pour comprendre les obstacles à l’autonomisation des femmes et leurs causes profondes. Afin de souligner aujourd’hui la Journée internationale de la femme, le Centre de recherches pour le développement international (CRDI) organise l’événement Du savoir à l’action : Améliorer la vie des femmes. En tant que directrice des Économies inclusives, j’aurai le plaisir d’accueillir sept experts qui présenteront les connaissances produites par les équipes de recherche soutenues par le CRDI sur deux questions...

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Knowledge to action on International Women’s Day

 

Sue Szabo, Director, Social and Economic Policy, International Development Research Centre (IDRC) 

Research is crucial to understanding the barriers to women’s empowerment and their deeper causes. To mark International Women’s Day today, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is holding the event Knowledge to Action: Improving Women’s Lives. As director of Inclusive Economies, I will have the pleasure of welcoming seven panelists who will highlight the knowledge generated by IDRC-supported research teams on two crucial issues for women: economic empowerment and ending violence. 
 
Governments and the private sector...

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Why are we still debating diversity versus merit in 2015?

 

Susan Franceschet, University of Calgary; Karen Beckwith, Case Western Reserve University; Claire Annesley, University of Sussex

Canada’s first gender-equal cabinet is being celebrated by equality and diversity advocates but criticized by those who believe that using selection criteria like gender, race, or ethnicity violates merit. Those who trumpet merit believe that selection to high-level positions like cabinet or corporate boards must be based on demonstrable skills, achievements, and credentials with no consideration of the other characteristics of the individuals holding those credentials. In fact, critics of quotas as a mechanism to ensure diversity go a step further, arguing that quotas will lead to the...

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Stephen Toope: Reconciliation begins by closing the graduation gap

 

This op-ed was published in The Globe and Mail on August 31, 2015.

By Stephen Toope, President of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

As millions of Canadian young people gear up for a return to classrooms this fall, the “back to school” rallying cry is ubiquitous – in advertising, in media headlines and in household discussions across the country. Which professors, which courses, which degree, what to wear, where to be?

But for many people in Canada, especially those who work in education, other questions have begun to cut through the noise. Who is not back to school? Who and what is missing on our campuses?

These questions push to the fore this fall because of the groundbreaking work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) chaired by Justice...

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Who is telling our stories? Canadian millennials in literature and the humanities

 

Kofi Hope, Rhodes Scholar, Doctor of Philosophy in Politics & Managing Director, Community Empowering Enterprises

On July 14, Go Set a Watchman will be released to the general public, a sequel of sorts to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.  Few works of literature have had a more profound role in shaping conversations on race in the 20th century than To Kill a Mockingbird

For my part, I read the book in 1999 as a grade 10 student in Mississauga.  While...

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On National Aboriginal Day, what does reconciliation mean to you?

Jean-Paul Restoule, Associate Professor of Aboriginal Education at OISE/University of Toronto

Remember when National Aboriginal Day was called National Aboriginal Solidarity Day? Just weeks after the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) released its final report, we would do well to consider the critical role solidarity plays in reconciliation.

Achieving genuine reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in Canada is a responsibility we all share. We can’t wait for our governments or our administrative heads to make change.  ...

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Global sustainable development goals have potential to drive change in Canada

Shannon Kindornay, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University

There is no question that 2015 is a year for change both within Canada and abroad. As noted by Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation, in her blog on Canada’s engagement with global social justice, not only are Canadians facing an election year in 2015, but changes are afoot on the global stage. This year, governments will negotiate a set of universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the United Nations to replace the Millennium Development Goals that will expire at the end of 2015. These goals will apply to all countries...

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Les femmes et le terrorisme

Nathalie Des Rosiers, Université d’Ottawa

Partout dans le monde, on s’efforce d’inventer des solutions juridiques pour mettre fin au terrorisme.   Le Canda ne fait pas exception : un projet de loi propose des détentions préventives,  un partage d’information entre agences et un mandat au service de renseignements « d’agir » pour prévenir des attaques.  Le public est prêt à accepter ces mesures sans précédent parce qu’ils ont peur de ces attaques féroces imprévisibles qu’on voit sur YouTube et à la télé.

La violence faite aux femmes, la disparition ou le meurtre d’une...

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