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We Are Coming Home: Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence

Robert R. Janes, independent scholar

We Are Coming Home: Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence (Athabasca University Press) is an unusual book in the museum world – not only because it’s about the unconditional return of sacred objects, but also because five of the eight contributors are Blackfoot ceremonialists or spiritual leaders. Although the idea for the book was the result of a restaurant conversation, it is actually the culmination of an evolving, 10-year relationship between the Glenbow Museum (Calgary, Alberta) and the four First Nations of the Blackfoot Confederacy – a process of reciprocity, deepening understanding, and mutual appreciation.  The editor of this volume,...

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Lunch-Bucket Lives: Remaking the Workers' City

Craig Heron, York University

Hamilton is an iconic city in Canada. For generations, it has been the quintessential factory town, a status confirmed by the view of fire-spewing, smoke-belching Dark Satanic Mills from the Burlington Skyway on the road to Niagara Falls. I was not raised there, and can’t remember any childhood visits. But, in the late 1970s, it was at the forefront of my mind as I started thinking about a PhD dissertation topic. I was interested in the wave of profound changes that hit industrial cities across the continent in the early years of the twentieth-century: large-scale corporate consolidation; new management and technological systems that ushered in mass production and a “Second”...

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Remembering the 1885 Resistance 130 Years Later

 

Michel Hogue, Carleton University

The Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP) funded the recent publication of Michel Hogue’s book Metis and the Medicine Line: Creating a Border and Dividing a People (University of Regina Press). The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences invited Professor Hogue to share his reflections on the 130th anniversary of the North-West Resistance.

Ride "swift-safe in the night, ride without rest," writes poet Marilyn Dumont, urging Metis leader Gabriel Dumont to flee as Canadian troops close in on the Metis at Batoche in May 1885. She admonishes him to

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Leading Research Universities in a Competitive World

Robert Lacroix and Louis Maheu, Université de Montréal

The Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP) has funded the recent publication of Les grandes universités de recherche : Institutions autonomes dans un environnement concurrentiel, a book by Robert Lacroix and Louis Maheu (published by Presses de l'Université de Montréal). The book is also available in English, under the title Leading Research Universities in a Competitive World (published by McGill-Queen's University Press). The Federation for the...

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ASPP Spotlight: Vicarious Kinks, by Ummni Khan

Professor Ummni Khan, Associate Professor in the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University, is not one to shy away from “taboo” research topics. Her latest book, Vicarious Kinks: SM in the Socio-Legal Imaginary (University of Toronto Press), takes a closer look at the claims made about sadomasochism and its practitioners, and what this in turn says about the institutions making those claims. This ASPP-funded title certainly caught our attention, and so we turned to Professor Khan with the question: Are some topics too taboo to tackle for a researcher?

Here is Professor Khan’s response:

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ASPP Spotlight: Hockey, PQ: Canada's Game in Quebec's Popular Culture

By Amy J. Ransom, Associate Professor of French at Central Michigan University

Hockey is arguably the most identifiably Canadian cultural marker. We can take its national significance as a given considering that even the Prime Minister has found time in his busy schedule to write a book about the sport!

My goal in Hockey, PQ: Canada's Game in Quebec's Popular Culture (University of Toronto Press) was to convey the meaning of hockey in Francophone Quebec to the Rest of Canada. It might be argued that the love of “la game” is the only thing uniting the two solitudes, as illustrated by the popularity of the Quebec film Bon cop, bad cop (2005) across Canada.

Although regional and linguistic rivalries...

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ASPP Books: "Free to Believe: Rethinking Freedom of Conscience and Religion in Canada"

 

Mary Anne Waldron

University of Toronto Press, 2013

Christine McKenna Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

It was revealed this week that the government of Quebec is aiming to introduce a new piece of legislation called the “Charter of Quebec Values.” This bill would ban the display of religious symbols in the province’s public institutions – including by civil service employees, who would be...

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