Big Thinking

Why we need to remove the uncertainty around assisted dying

 

This op-ed was published in The HIll Times on February 29, 2016

Jocelyn Downie is a professor in the faculties of law and medicine at Dalhousie University. She has advised several official committees on assisted dying, such as the Canadian Senate Committee on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Prof. Downie presented a lecture on assisted dying on Parliament Hill on Feb. 23 as a part of the Big Thinking lecture series hosted by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

The Supreme Court of Canada has made it clear that patients who meet the Carter criteria should have access to physician-...

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Why we need to remove the uncertainty around assisted dying

 

This op-ed was published in The HIll Times on February 29, 2016

Jocelyn Downie is a professor in the faculties of law and medicine at Dalhousie University. She has advised several official committees on assisted dying, such as the Canadian Senate Committee on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Prof. Downie presented a lecture on assisted dying on Parliament Hill on Feb. 23 as a part of the Big Thinking lecture series hosted by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

The Supreme Court of Canada has made it clear that patients who meet the Carter criteria should have access to physician-...

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Sociologist Irene Bloemraad Speaks about Immigration in Canada

 

Nour Aoude, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Recent changes to immigration law in Canada drew criticism from legal and human rights groups, reminding us that immigration policy is an ongoing and heated conversation in which we all have a stake. In order to engage in this conversation as effectively as possible, it is important to benefit from the opinion of expert researchers on Canadian immigration.

What are the unique strengths of Canada’s immigration policy? How do we stack up against the US and other immigrant-attracting countries? Is our system beginning to show cracks? These are the questions that Irene Bloemraad,...

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Moving beyond the mic: Big Thinking speakers keep thinking big

Since the kick-off to the 2013-2014 season, three of the Federation’s Big Thinking lectures have featured a top-flight researcher who continues to make airwaves with ideas and opinions on issues affecting current policy discussions. Let’s see what they have been up to since speaking to us in Ottawa...

In October, Richard Hawkins, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy at the University of Calgary, “proposed how policy makers can - and must - start thinking very differently about innovation. He argued that Canadian policies aimed at stimulating innovation are directly at odds with what we've...

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Innovation for the nation

 

Christine McKenna Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The 2013-2014 season of Big Thinking kicked off on October 3rd with Dr. Richard Hawkins, Professor at the University of Calgary and Fellow of the Institute for Science Society and Policy (ISSP) at the University of Ottawa. While prorogation meant this month’s lecture couldn’t be held at the usual venue on Parliament Hill, the alternative location at HUB Ottawa – a collaborative working space designed to promote social innovation – provided an environment that nicely matched the theme of Hawkins’ address: “Whither innovation? Moving beyond the buzzword.”

Does Canada ...

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Inclusive Innovation: what is the role of rural and remote regions in the knowledge economy?

Governments the world over have launched ambitious national innovation strategies, designed to use scientific and technological developments to produce economic growth and address social challenges. Canada has been one of the most aggressive on this front, supporting a wide range of measures designed to promote commercialization and job creation. Globally, these policies have strengthened urban economies, but have had much smaller impacts on rural and remote regions.  In Canada, northern, rural and Aboriginal communities have yet to feel the full benefit of scientific and technological initiatives. Our innovation outputs as a whole continue to lag internationally. 

How do we address this innovation deficit, while also encouraging creative regional development? Join Ken Coates, Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, as he explores how...

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Big Thinking: Alex Sévigny on CBC

Photo courtesy Marcio Cabral de Moura

On March 8, Alex Sévigny, Program Director in the McMaster-Syracuse Master of Communications Management program at McMaster University, came to Ottawa as part of CFHSS' Big Thinking lecture series on Parliament Hill. His lecture, Who's driving the story? Question Period, social media and changing political communications, was attended by over 100 MPs, Senators, business and not-for-profit folk--look for the video of his talk up on our site shortly. Before heading up to the Hill to give the breakfast lecture, Alex...

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Innovation? What innovation? Re-thinking progress and how we measure it

CHFSS kicked off the Winter 2012 Big Thinking series on January 31 with Professor Jeremy de Beer from the University of Ottawa. Held in partnership with the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), the event drew over 150 MPs, Senators and public servants, as well as many university presidents who were in town as part of AUCC’s Day on the Hill.

Prof. de Beer’s talk, Innovation? What innovation? Re-thinking progress and how we measure it, explored new options for considering intellectual property and how policies can best encourage new, creative research. He argued for a more holistic approach to innovation, one that values the contributions of the social sciences and humanities, while also challenging the ways we traditionally measure...

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Generation Next: How are the children of immigrants faring in Canada

Alison Hebbs, Director, Policy and Communications
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

You’d think that many people take on the life-altering process of moving to a new country with a better life for their children in mind. Canada has worked hard to open its doors for families in search of a brighter future.

And how are these efforts translating? Well, in Canada, the pattern is one of upward mobility for second generation immigrants...overall. For example, the children of Chinese and South Asian immigrants outperform their parents when it comes to educational attainment and labour market outcomes. Actually, they outperform the general Canadian population too. However, as Dr. Philip Kelly, associate professor of geography at York University, explained...

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Big Thinking Podcast: Double Diepeveen and shiny things edition

Photo courtesy joshuaseye on Flickr.

Will the real modernity please stand up? This episode of the Big Thinking podcast delves into the world of modernity, skepticism, fraud and satire. Leonard Diepeveen of Dalhousie University talks about his research on the emergence of striking new art, bored soldiers writing fake avant garde verse, and parodies of Gertrude Stein – and what that reveals about modernity and society, even today. Plus, we get a sneak preview of Len’s explorations – with Timothy van Laar of the University of Illinois – of all things shiny.

[podcast]...

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